Communicating with USCG helicopter??

MUTNAV

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There may be an easy solution to all this, and as mentioned above, talking to the USCG should be the #1 step before all else. Amateurs trying to find loopholes in the rules or other work around without talking to all the players involved isn't the way to do it.
I don't think it would really be a loophole. I'm certain that upon talking with the air-station the USCG helicopters were at would have brought up any problem, if it existed. I would be more concerned about the aircrews willingness to adopt non-standard procedures.

For my part, I don't see working HF split as being any different than working a foreign country that has different amatuer HF allocations than the U.S..

Thanks
Joel
 

mmckenna

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Amateur radio shouldn't be involved at all. A search and rescue agency should have a Part 90 license as well as suitable part 90 radios with the current list of NIFOG frequencies in them.

But we're talking about 30 years ago, not what we have now. Kind of hard to figure this out without knowing exactly what was or wasn't available 30 years ago.
 

milf

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Before the NIFOG, and the term interop was invented after 911, there is another pair of words that has been forgotten? MUTUAL AID??? There has always been a nationwide mutual aid set of freqs in VHF Low, VHF High, UHF. Then later on the 800 MHz NSPAC came into being. 3 that were standard in almost every public safety set up were always Nationwide SAR on 155.1600, NLEEC on 155.4750, and back then what was called Medical Calling on 155.2800. As well as every State had its own set of Statewide Mutual Aid stuff. USCG once called in by Local/State officials would be informed of what the Operating Frequency was, in fact most USCG Stations do actually have an idea of whats going on in the areas they work in and who they will be talking to as well as how to talk to them. Vice versa for the locals.
 

mmckenna

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Before the NIFOG, and the term interop was invented after 911, there is another pair of words that has been forgotten? MUTUAL AID??? There has always been a nationwide mutual aid set of freqs in VHF Low, VHF High, UHF. Then later on the 800 MHz NSPAC came into being. 3 that were standard in almost every public safety set up were always Nationwide SAR on 155.1600, NLEEC on 155.4750, and back then what was called Medical Calling on 155.2800. As well as every State had its own set of Statewide Mutual Aid stuff. USCG once called in by Local/State officials would be informed of what the Operating Frequency was, in fact most USCG Stations do actually have an idea of whats going on in the areas they work in and who they will be talking to as well as how to talk to them. Vice versa for the locals.
Absolutely. We have arrangements with the local USCG group/airsta to do that. There are established frequency plans to allow interoperability. USCG has our frequencies, and we have access to a few VHF marine channels for USCG interoperability. Not a big deal now, but back in the days of rockbound radios, that would have been a challenge.
 

k6cpo

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You were in a Navy unit responsible for harbor surveillance and defense that didn't have boats !!!!

Jeesh, I think most Air Force bases on the water have water borne Security (Think Macdill and Tyndall) I think there was an Air Force base that had some approach lights that extended out into a bay and the maintenace people needed there own boat. All of these would rate the use of marine VHF.

Of course this is now and that was then.

Thanks
Joel
Notice I said NAVAL RESERVE... Back then, the Reserves were often left sucking the hind teat for funding and boats just weren't part of the budget. I served in the same type of unit in Vietnam in 1968 and we had plenty of boats. After the Vietnam war, the mission was transferred to the Reserves and budgets became thin. Everything changed again after 9-11 and now the mission is part of the US Navy's Expeditionary Warfare Command and is fully funded, including boats.
 

Mike_G_D

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Didn't have to be an hf split, at least in the 90's. I had a dual band a
Alinco ht that received well outside the 2 meter band at that time and I think Global Wolfsburg broadband vhf/uhf radios were common on a lot of public service and fed aircraft back then. If you had a decent ham 2 m handheld that could receive the marine frequencies and the helo had a decent wide band v/uhf radios - same kind of deal. You transmit to the helo on your prearranged 2 m Ham frequency and the helo transmits back to you on whatever marine (or SAR or whatever) frequency. Yes, you'd need to prearrange things, of course, and maybe not ideal but, with planning and some practice better than a note dropped with a weight. Same basic concept as the hf split idea but I'd think a little easier and maybe a tad more reliable portability-wise.
 

W7FDX

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Around here, (Illinois) I know the medical helicopters have a frequency known as IREACH. Its the Illinois Radio Emergency Assistance CHannel. The freq is 155.055. All the fire and ambulance vehicles that I know of have this freq as well. I know its been around quite a while. Not sure if other states have something like that. On the law enforcement side, ISPERN (Illinois State Police Emergency Radio Network) at 155.475 is a common channel. I think it is common for most agencies to have both of these.
155.475 is the national PD common frequency so almost any police unit that has a VHF radio should have that channel programmed in.
 

milf

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155.475 is the national PD common frequency so almost any police unit that has a VHF radio should have that channel programmed in.
155.4750 official name now is VLAW31, and it is paired now with 155.48250 which is VLAW32. Back in the day VLAW31 had many names, for most places it was Nationwide Law Enforcement Emergency Calling, or simply Nationwide Law. Some States would call it their own like IL did. (Which they should NOT be doing at all anymore per NIFOG best practices. But then again some folks like to be special no matter what.)
 

lu81fitter

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155.4750 official name now is VLAW31, and it is paired now with 155.48250 which is VLAW32. Back in the day VLAW31 had many names, for most places it was Nationwide Law Enforcement Emergency Calling, or simply Nationwide Law. Some States would call it their own like IL did. (Which they should NOT be doing at all anymore per NIFOG best practices. But then again some folks like to be special no matter what.)
I'm not so sure it's a matter of "being special". I think at this point, it's just habit. Illinois State Police dispatchers call out "ISPERN Units, District xx", then describe the event taking place. It's just how its been done for a long time. I've heard that since I've been listening back to the late 1980's. I was not aware that it was not a preferred thing to do.
 
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