• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

I'm just going to put this here...

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N4GIX

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Not to mention that dPMR (TM) isn't legal to use in the US or Canada.
 

AA6IO

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So glad ICOM is selling their IC-8600 for about $2500 with dPMR but not DMR. I'll be interested to see who actually buys this radio in US or Europe.
 

chief21

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dPMR emissions / technology might be legal on certain authorized part 90 frequencies in the US, but I believe that the 'official' dPMR-badged radios used in Europe operate on 446 MHz... which are amateur frequencies in the US.

John AC4JK
 

nd5y

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dPMR emissions / technology might be legal on certain authorized part 90 frequencies in the US, but I believe that the 'official' dPMR-badged radios used in Europe operate on 446 MHz... which are amateur frequencies in the US.
You are confusing dPMR and dPMR446.
European dPMR446 is license free and limited to 0.5 W on a few frequencies above the PMR446 frequences. Using those frequencies in the US requires an amateur radio license.

More info at Welcome to the dPMR Association, Narrowband 6.25Khz Digital Standards Defined
 

mmckenna

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Correct, PMR446 is the European equivalent of the FRS service here in the USA. (license by rule/low power)
Since 446MHz falls in the 70CM amateur band here in the USA, it's not illegal to use in the USA if you hold an amateur license.

The emission DPMR is not illegal to use in the USA, just not favored, not popular, and it can be used by amateur radio operators anywhere on frequencies they are permitted to use digital voice on. When I did a quick search on the FCC OET site, there were a few FCC approved Part 90 radios that did have the DPMR emission designators.
 

mmckenna

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It's similar to NXDN in a lot of ways. 6.25kHz FDMA. In fact, as mentioned above, some Icom and Kenwood NXDN radios will run DPMR.
And, since it's got a wide acceptance amongst manufacturers in Europe, it would be something that could/should catch on here in the states with some users. Eventually getting forced to 6.25kHz channels is going to happen on the Part 90 side, and that also means that eventually amateur will go that way also. It'd be pretty dang awesome if amateur radio would chose a common digital standard shared amongst manufacturers. While DMR, NXDN, Fusion, D-Star, P25 are all nice, having a common very narrow band emission common across amateur radio would certainly benefit the emergency communications side of ham.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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Uh oh, then you should probably let the FCC know. They've been approving 4K81F1E radios.
Yeah what is with that? Are the radios so awful they must turn the deviation almost off to comply with the emission mask? I really wish the TIA or FCC would make a noise about this worthless junk.

Gag me with a spoon. These cheap radios make me puke. Why do they get so much support?

Can we all agree that one should not spend less than $200 for a budget radio?
 
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mmckenna

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Yeah what is with that? Are the radios so awful they must turn the deviation almost off to comply with the emission mask? I really wish the TIA or FCC would make a noise about this worthless junk.
Yeah, I guess QC is so bad that it's a preemptive approach.

Can we all agree that one should not spend less than $200 for a budget radio?
Absolutely!
 
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