LoJack Question

dlwtrunked

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They definitely use towers, both for VHF as well as LTE. The VHF sites can be easily found on the FCC website. My nearest tower is still transmitting to this day.
And always had towers. Usually those are licensed to state police and are in the FCC database. I have visited over 50 of the tower sites in about a dozen state.
 

ScannerSK

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The original poster of this thread was asking about how to identify a signal from a stolen vehicle. Attached is an audio example of the frequent stolen vehicle tracking pulses verses the longer in duration however less frequent tower data bursts. Tracking pulses are transmitted every second or two when something stolen is being actively tracked or when first activated. The pulses will become less frequent when not being tracked to save on battery life.
 

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dave3825

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when LoJack says it is dead - I believe them.
When a person says,
The VHF based LoJack era was dead as of 2021.
I tend to not believe them, especially when I am still hearing plenty of bursts on vhf, in 2024, 3 years later.



https://www.amazon.com/Apple-MX532AM-A-AirTag/dp/B0933BVK6T
Amazon.com : tile tracker
Amazon.com : samsung tracker tags
Use all three to increase recovery. Except you'll need a Samsung phone (I think or any Android) and an Apple phone. Tablets would work too. Or you could run Android on A Pi...

While those may help in certain situations, pretty sure if they are somewhere not near a bluetooth connection, it will only give last known location. And battery life could be a concern

The Bouncie 4G/LTE is nice but OBD2 ports are the first thing an experienced thief will check. The ones with sim cards are nice but those to are running on battery. There are some hard wired ones also but if the car battery gets disconnected, same thing, last known.
 

BinaryMode

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The original poster of this thread was asking about how to identify a signal from a stolen vehicle. Attached is an audio example of the frequent stolen vehicle tracking pulses verses the longer in duration however less frequent tower data bursts. Tracking pulses are transmitted every second or two when something stolen is being actively tracked or when first activated. The pulses will become less frequent when not being tracked to save on battery life.

Cool, thanks for that. Is there a back story behind this capture?
 

BinaryMode

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Data is from the FCC, search nationwide on 173.0750
Altho an NTIA allocation, they turned licensing over to the FCC

As to the LEGACY process for activation
1 - Correct
2 - Files the state required Theft Report - generally a signed report
2a - Dispatch/Desk then needs to enter the vehicle into NCIC with atleast the VIN being correct
3 - Correct
4 - Was a pretty good recovery rate in New England for many years.

Didn't quote you...
 

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ecps92

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Data is from the FCC, search nationwide on 173.0750
Altho an NTIA allocation, they turned licensing over to the FCC

As to the LEGACY process for activation
1 - Correct
2 - Files the state required Theft Report - generally a signed report
2a - Dispatch/Desk then needs to enter the vehicle into NCIC with atleast the VIN being correct
3 - Correct
4 - Was a pretty good recovery rate in New England for many years.
errr, Yes You did, you asked in Post #38 and referenced back to my posting

and I quite
Where did you get that information?

Refer to this post.
 

spacellamaman

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T
The original poster of this thread was asking about how to identify a signal from a stolen vehicle. Attached is an audio example of the frequent stolen vehicle tracking pulses verses the longer in duration however less frequent tower data bursts. Tracking pulses are transmitted every second or two when something stolen is being actively tracked or when first activated. The pulses will become less frequent when not being tracked to save on battery life.
Thanks!
I always wondered what it would sound like.

You must've been right on their tail eh?
 

ScannerSK

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Cool, thanks for that. Is there a back story behind this capture?
Thanks!
I always wondered what it would sound like.
You must've been right on their tail eh?
The audio was from a file that another user uploaded to YouTube years ago however is no longer available. I have recorded so many LoJacks through the years that I lost track. However, the audio sample referenced above is a good sample.
 

ScannerSK

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I have received LoJacks from over four miles away while at other times they are so weak they can only be received within a few blocks radius. I think the one that had a weak signal had an antenna wire that was disconnected as it was not responding to speed up requests sent by the towers. Most LoJacks can be received at least one mile away with a decent receiver. Denver has an impound lot that used to always be pinging with LoJack signals from vehicles towed to the lot which had not yet been deactivated. This may still be the case however I have been out of the loop for a while.
 

ecps92

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I have received LoJacks from over four miles away while at other times they are so weak they can only be received within a few blocks radius. I think the one that had a weak signal had an antenna wire that was disconnected as it was not responding to speed up requests sent by the towers. Most LoJacks can be received at least one mile away with a decent receiver. Denver has an impound lot that used to always be pinging with LoJack signals from vehicles towed to the lot which had not yet been deactivated. This may still be the case however I have been out of the loop for a while.
yup, some would beep for days, as the entering department had not cancelled/cleared it from NCIC as the recovering agency never told em'
 

spacellamaman

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I have received LoJacks from over four miles away while at other times they are so weak they can only be received within a few blocks radius. I think the one that had a weak signal had an antenna wire that was disconnected as it was not responding to speed up requests sent by the towers. Most LoJacks can be received at least one mile away with a decent receiver. Denver has an impound lot that used to always be pinging with LoJack signals from vehicles towed to the lot which had not yet been deactivated. This may still be the case however I have been out of the loop for a while.

Was all of this monitoring in pursuit of the hobby or work related?
 

BinaryMode

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Joke follows:

What if you tracked down the LoJack signal to the car, pulled along side and jester for the Perp to roll down their window? The following is the exchange:

Car 1- Hey, yo, dog. That car you're driving in, it's totally stolen and the police know it due to LoJack. I'd run if I were you.

Car 2 Perp- *makes surprised and confused face* "Yeah, alright then, thanks. *slides down the seat as to hide himself.*
 

ScannerSK

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Joke follows:

What if you tracked down the LoJack signal to the car, pulled along side and jester for the Perp to roll down their window? The following is the exchange:
Car 1- Hey, yo, dog. That car you're driving in, it's totally stolen and the police know it due to LoJack. I'd run if I were you.
Car 2 Perp- *makes surprised and confused face* "Yeah, alright then, thanks. *slides down the seat as to hide himself.*
Police drive around in undercover or personal vehicles at times transmitting LoJack signals from what they refer to as rabbits for training purposes. I would not want to get caught for aiding and abetting a criminal. Most of these car thieves just want a quick ride and like the adrenaline rush. Someone telling them it is stolen would only add to the rush however it probably would make them ditch it sooner. They might even pull out a gun as they are not in their right mind. You have to laugh when the thief is confronted and all they can say is some guy parked the car in front of my house and walked away!

I saw a story once of LoJacks installed in street light poles. It turned out one light pole company was stealing another company's light poles and using them in their installations. A lot of LoJacks are installed in skid steers and the like. Even boats and motorcycles have LoJacks. A person never knows exactly what object the LoJack signal is coming from unless overheard on the scanner however typically it is a vehicle. Sometimes a LoJack signal leads to a large chop shop where cars are being chopped up and sold for parts.

LoJack provided recovery stories for a while however it appears they have ceased doing this many years ago. The following has over 50 pages of recovery stories: Blog - LoJack Recovery Stories.
 
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