• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

Motorola XTS 5000

ElroyJetson

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I've got some P25 radios for sale....not soliciting, this is just background info. A guy responds to the listing and asks if I can provide the encryption key....LOL.

115,792,089,237,316,195,423,570,985,008,687,907,853,269,984,665,640,564,039,457,584,007,913,129,639,936.


That's how many possible encryption keys there are for AES-256. Pick one , maybe you'll get lucky! :unsure:

Obviously that's not the type of yutz I want to sell a radio to.
 

JethrowJohnson

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I've got some P25 radios for sale....not soliciting, this is just background info. A guy responds to the listing and asks if I can provide the encryption key....LOL.

115,792,089,237,316,195,423,570,985,008,687,907,853,269,984,665,640,564,039,457,584,007,913,129,639,936.


That's how many possible encryption keys there are for AES-256. Pick one , maybe you'll get lucky! :unsure:

Obviously that's not the type of yutz I want to sell a radio to.
Isn't each encryption key algorithm different, or do they all use those same keys?
 

JethrowJohnson

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Let’s think about this. If everyone uses the same key variable as the one posted on a worldwide forum how secure would that be? Not being rude, just trying to get your brain thinking.
That's what I figured, but the way he said it almost sounded like that's how all AES256 systems work. Thanks for the clarification. 👍
 

ElroyJetson

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Each different encryption algorithm of course has its own set of possible keys. Assume that they are not interchangeable between algorithms and you'll be right nearly all the time. There may be some that actually might be able to use the same key sequence, but I'm not even quite sure about that. I don't have much experience with encryption, personally. Haven't had the need.

The number I posted is not a key, it is the number of possible keys for the AES-256 algorithm.
 
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jbella

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But! I would wager that for ADP, if you used 000 as the number and 0123456789 as they key, that would be at least a couple keys somewhere. :ROFLMAO:
 

kayn1n32008

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Isn't each encryption key algorithm different, or do they all use those same keys?
There are 3 major encryption algorithms used on LMR systems today. AES256, DES AND RC4.

A system admin that properly manages encryption uses randomly generated keys. These keys are securely stored in either a KVL or a KMF. Statistically, if a random key is generated, the odds of someone else generating the exact same key is as close to zero as you can get.
 

kayn1n32008

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That's what I figured, but the way he said it almost sounded like that's how all AES256 systems work. Thanks for the clarification. 👍
Additionally, a system admin that takes voice security seriously, will use multiple keys and change those keys regularly using OTAR(Over The Air Rekey). This way, unless a radio is intentionally wiped of its keys, it can be securely rekeyed any time.

They also do not use a single CKR(Common Key Reference).
 
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