New Jersey Transit page in DB says "Hunter, NJ"?

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Analogrules

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I am done arguing, but there is nothing called Main Line in NJ except for the Main Bergen Line (NJ Transit Line, aka route, aka service).

I refer to Amtrak's official website and can easily see what they call each the stretch of track in NJ and it sure isn't Main Line.

Everyone should look at the Pennsylvania RR page and under Railroads you will see the REAL Main Line, which is actually part of the Keystone Line between Harrisburg and Philly. In NJ, it is Acela Express as indicated on their schedules. I will be in NY Penn Tomorrow and will even grab a schedule to prove it. I do not go by employee slang, I go by what Amtrak officially calls it to the public.
 

Analogrules

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Also, none of you were able to show any credible proof from Amtrak's website showing anything called Main Line in NJ. You can troll all you want, but at least I provided links from their own website proving it is called Acela Express in the NE Region.
 
D

DaveNF2G

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You obviously cannot distinguish between the human-friendly naming of a service and the official designation for a stretch of track.

All of those services that run over a particular stretch of track use exactly the same frequencies, which need be listed in the DB only once.

(I live less than a mile from one of the busiest Amtrak stations in the northeast and I monitor almost daily.)
 

slapshot0017

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Oh for the love of god... It is called the "Main Line" in the employee timetable. This is what the employees consider the name of the track.

If you ever listen to the radio like you say you do you would hear them identify it as the "Main Line" in the first section of the Form D or any other transmission when they refer to the track.

The northeast corridor is broken up into 4 sections. Boston to New Haven is consider shoreline east, New Haven to New Rochelle is considered the New Haven line and is owned by the state of connecticut, the portion from New Rochelle to DC is considered the "Main Line", And then if you had half a brain you would also know the northeast corridor technically extends to Newport News Virginia from DC where the physical name of the track is something else.

It's not going to be on Amtrak official website you half wit because it's not a publicly recognized name!


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GTR8000

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Also, none of you were able to show any credible proof from Amtrak's website showing anything called Main Line in NJ. You can troll all you want, but at least I provided links from their own website proving it is called Acela Express in the NE Region.
Yeah uh, you clearly don't know what a troll is. When you have ten people with knowledge trying to explain something to one person (you), and that one person (you) continues to engage in nonsense arguments in spite of the facts being presented...the troll is that one person (yes, you again). :roll:
 

Analogrules

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Slapshot, I already proved what Amtrak really calls it, while I am still waiting to see a link from Amtrak's site proving it is called Main Line. Even if you google "Amtrak Mainline" you will see that it represents the line between Philly and Harrisburg. Even indicated in the RR db as such on the Pennsylvania RR page. So until you can prove on Amtrak's Official Website otherwise (because it does not get any more credible than that), then you remain the ignorant one. I showed proof and you did not. End of story. I suggest admins close this page since you people are now resorting to name calling now, since you cannot disprove my facts.
 

Analogrules

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that pdf was from over 7 years ago in 2010. LOL. It is NOW CALLED ACELA EXPRESS. All you did was prove that at one time in history, they referred to it as Main Line. I will try to grab a 2017 schedule showing what they call it NOW. Get out of the past!!
 
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mikewazowski

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End of story. I suggest admins close this page since you people are now resorting to name calling now, since you cannot disprove my facts.
If you want it closed, please use the Report Post function on the offending post and a Moderator will look at it.
However, might I suggest that you are never going to convince each other and there's not much more point in arguing this ad nauseam?
I would also suggest that if you find a member's posts irritate you to the point you get so riled up that you resort to name calling, that you might want to place that member on your Ignore List?
 

burner50

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Your named corridor can have multiple tracks called leads, spurs, yards, sidings, or main lines.

It's not an amtrak thing, or anything to do with that corridor. You can even have multiple mains on a particular corridor. There are main lines in every state of the country that has railroads.

You're thinking of it from a customer perspective, when in reality is is something that only applies to the operation of the railroad.

https://www.amtrak.com/pdf/factsheets/NEWYORK15.pdf

There is a document referencing mainline, main track, etc several times for several different corridors.

In many many many places, the radio frequency for a mainline is different than that of adjacent tracks so that traffic doesn't interfere with each other, so it is important to know if the radio traffic is for the mainline, or a yard, or industry lead, etc.

In other words, this railroad engineer of ten years says you're wrong.
 

ucvgabe

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Lmao I love this. He keeps saying "this article is too old, it's obsolete" yet uses designation made by a railroad that stopped being a thing in the 1960s as his main reference.

Do you know how mind-boggled the public would be if the railroad used every technical term as common terms with their customers? Of course Amtrak isn't going to refer to it as the "main line" because no one will grasp it. The Northeast Corridor is symbolic and easy to remember as a name that represents the trackage that spans Boston to DC.

Here's basically how it goes, and since you seem to be familiar with NJ Transit locations and you live along the Raritan Line, I'll use that line as an example since I myself also live along the Raritan line and I study these types of things. I will mainly use the span of the Raritan Valley Line that NJ Transit actually owns - the span between Aldene [the interlocking east of Cranford] and High Bridge].

Let's take Raritan for example. Raritan is the main yard for the RVL. However, it is not on the very end of the line in High Bridge, it is mid-span in Raritan. So, because of this, the trains that either go to or come from High Bridge have to pass Raritan Yard to get to/from. To identify the track that trains use to pass the yard, they call it the Main Line. It is the main span of track that keeps going from A to B, rather than the sidings and yard tracks that branch off and/or stop in between. So when a train passes through that area and they are going passed the yard rather than into the yard, they call that the main line. When a train is on the main line, it means they are on the main track of the line as opposed to one of the side tracks.

If a train in Raritan is switching cars around and they have to reverse out of the yard, essentially blocking any other train traffic, they call the dispatcher and request permission to "foul the main", which means they are requesting permission to momentarily exit the yard and block the main track, even if it's only half a car length, so that they can do what they have to do.

Now, the Raritan Valley line is the official terminology for the line, but it's still referred to by personnel involved in internal railroad operations as the main line to represent it being the main span of track for the line.
 

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RadioDitch

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Geez, I leave on a work trip and I miss all the fun. For those who are interested, the Northeast Corridor consists of:

Main Line: New Haven to Boston (NHB)
Main Line: Harold to CP216 (HNR)
New York Terminal District (NYT)
Main Line: New York to Philadelphia (NYP)
Main Line: Philadelphia to Washington (PW)
Washington Terminal District (WUT)

Springfield Line = Main Line: Mill River to Springfield (MRS)
Keystone Corridor = Main Line: Philadelphia to Harrisburg (PH)
 

Analogrules

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The issue here is that you are calling several different lines "Main Line" and on their official website to the public in which I have already provided links to, does not make any reference at all to "Main Line". I am NOT denying that perhaps employees of Amtrak may refer to it by that name among each other, however for the common hobbyist who does not work for Amtrak looking on the RR DB page could become very confused because it is simply NOT called the Main Line on their official website nor does it appear as such on the overhead public monitors (this is a FACT). It seems the general vote here is to keep it the way it is, but it may confuse a lot of people.

The RR DB does this for some other agencies too. Items are listed as (radio units) instead of actual locations such as NJ DOT Maintanence Crews. Personally, I like to see departments, locations, and titles listed as they are referred to by the general public and for the general public to understand. But oh well, this is why I keep my own notes.
 

Septa3371CSX1

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The only person it seems to confuse is yourself. I don't know why you continue to argue on here, I think there's been enough discussion and more than enough consensus as to what should be listed.
Agreed. To the average person using this website to get railroad info it helps to list the official line name since that is what they'll hear most often when listening to the comms.
 

Analogrules

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No, I am not confused because I live here. However, for those who are visiting NJ for the first time and look at the Railroad Page, I am sure they will wonder what the heck Main Line means since everywhere at Penn Station, it is called Acela Express/NE Corridor. Furthermore, their own website does not even call it Main Line. Not sure how much more I can stress this fact! But you guys are focused on calling it something only used by some of their employees supposedly while I showed proof what they call it to the general public.
 

W2SJW

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I've just about had enough of the bickering, so I'm removing the soapbox. Anyone starts another thread to even TRY and resurrect the arguement is getting slapped with an infraction.

Good day, gentlemen...

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