Only one side of the conversation.

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TheReaper

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Is it common to only get one side of a conversation? I have no problems hearing the dispatchers. I just can’t seem to pickup the other half. Could it be because my antennas are mounted inside? Thoughts?
 

Highpockets

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Is it common to only get one side of a conversation? I have no problems hearing the dispatchers. I just can’t seem to pickup the other half. Could it be because my antennas are mounted inside? Thoughts?
A better antenna should help.
 
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WayneH

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Railroad communications often use a remote base configuration where the dispatch console listens (and transmits) from a very high location, and often has multiple receivers.

So yes, it's pretty common.
 

flyingscotsman

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It has been my expierence while listening to Railroad communications.

The better the antenna is the better chance of hearing the engine.
(However if the Train is a fair distance out you will only hear the dispatcher)

Also location can be a big factor in reception performance.
 
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omrail

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the reason for this is that the dispatchers communications are broadcasted over a tower. I know that CPR towers in Canada are around 30 miles apart or so. the locomotive antennas are just on the top of the unit. also the person may be using the portable.
 

K4DHR

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Railroads don't use repeaters and in some instances, railroads may use a pair of frequencies for train to dispatcher and dispatcher to train. The Motorola Spectras found in locomotives are capable of selecting separate TX and RX frequencies. In this case, you'd have to scan between both frequencies to hear both sides of the conversation.

Depending on terrain, I can usually pick up locomotive radios from about 2-3 miles away with the cheapo rubber duck antenna on the my handheld scanner. Going through my 2m antenna on the car, I can receive locomotive radios from 10-20 miles away. I regularly get yard chatter from Tilford yard in Atlanta just a few miles from my home, which is about 15 miles straight line distance between the two.
 

Mick

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Train repeaters

In Southern California I hear these train repeaters:

160.245 BNSF PBX, input is 161.535
160.260 BNSF PBX, input is 161.490
160.290 UPRR PBX; input is 161.520
160.335 BNSF PBX; input is 161.460
160.425 L.A. Co. MTA, input is 160.635
160.605 UPRR PBX; input is 161.025
160.665 S.D. Trolley; input is 160.935
160.710 S.D. Trolley; input is 161.415
160.890 UPRR PBX; input is 161.04
160.935 L.A. Co. MTA, input is 160.755
161.055 Amtrak PD, L.A.; input is 161.475
161.145 L.A. Co. MTA, input is 160.725
161.265 L.A. Co. MTA, input is 160.695
161.565 L.A. Co. MTA, input is 160.47

Railroads don't use repeaters and in some instances, railroads may use a pair of frequencies for train to dispatcher and dispatcher to train. The Motorola Spectras found in locomotives are capable of selecting separate TX and RX frequencies. In this case, you'd have to scan between both frequencies to hear both sides of the conversation.

Depending on terrain, I can usually pick up locomotive radios from about 2-3 miles away with the cheapo rubber duck antenna on the my handheld scanner. Going through my 2m antenna on the car, I can receive locomotive radios from 10-20 miles away. I regularly get yard chatter from Tilford yard in Atlanta just a few miles from my home, which is about 15 miles straight line distance between the two.
 

N8IAA

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Is it common to only get one side of a conversation? I have no problems hearing the dispatchers. I just can’t seem to pickup the other half. Could it be because my antennas are mounted inside? Thoughts?
The dispatchers talk on one frequency to the trains, and the trains talk back on another as has been stated.
Norflok Southern uses 160.245 for dispatch to train, and 160.83 for train to dispatch. Common road channel for NS is 160.95. CSX uses 160.23 for dispatch. Common road frequency is 161.1. There is a really great yahoo group for N Ohio railfans. Also, the yahoo group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/railscan
HTH,
Larry
 
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