Police Cruiser Computers

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screamin72

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I know OKCPD has cruisers with laptops in them and they communicate to some database. I have a curious mind in this area. Anyone ever decode those or are they the 'E' word?
 

ZGX

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Like like most other agencies, OCPD's laptops are tied into OLETS/NLETS, as well as their CAD software for receiving calls. The system runs off a cellular card, not a specific radio frequency if they're like he rest of us.
 

PACNWDude

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Police Mobile Data Terminals

Many PD's use the cellular cards mentioned earlier as well as a WiFi/WiMax type of card. The Motorola MW520/800/810/900 series computers have two PCMCIA slots and also capability for cellular boards inside their CPU's. These are often times tied into 800-900MHz data modems for lower data rate comms as well.

L-3 Communications and Data911 tend to use similar systems as Motorola, but may have any combination of radio/cpu/camera system. If the specific PD is using data over radio, it will most often be encrypted.

There are several yahoo groups for the specific models of Motorola mobile data terminals.

Often times you can find great deals on these rugged older terminals on auction sites. I have several myself, including the ones mentioned above that find new purpose as controllers for software defined radios and industrial computers.
 

n0vza

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If a "device" (MDC-Mobile Data Computer, MDT-Mobile Data Terminal, laptop, etc.) has access to FBI Criminal Justice Information, checkout the remote access section of the FBI CJIS Security Policy, which is available to view/download from:

FBI — CJIS Security Policy Resource Center

This "access" would include a connection through a state "message switch" with connectivity to FBI/NCIC.

In short, the "transport" across the wireless network (cellular, radio, etc.) needs to be encrypted to a certain federal standard.

So, if you could capture and decode the radio "signal", you would then need to decrypt the actual data stream and then decode the actual data packet structure (within the data stream). As I recall, attempting to decrypt the encrypted transport would be illegal.
 

PACNWDude

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Good point, left out my Panasonic Toughbooks and GD GoBook VR2, they have card slots too. Just using the docking station, so didn't even think of that.
 
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screamin72

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Interesting read. Thanks all for sharing and answering my question. What I learned out of this is in a nutshell No can do!!:p
 
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screamin72

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I haven;t looked at those poles. in the morning when I walk to church I live on the edge of the downtown business district walking south on Walker Ill take notice. This area of OKC has cameras everywhere and those may be for them. Just guesing.:lol:

Next guess I have is maybe OG&E has some meter with wireless on it. Tax payer's bill.
 
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pinballwiz86

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Interesting read. Thanks all for sharing and answering my question. What I learned out of this is in a nutshell No can do!!:p
Nah...anyone with enough know how, money, and time can crack anything. Look at your friendly neighborhood NSA.
 

mancow

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Cellular encryption then a layer of net motion or whatever VPN encyption...yea it's not going to happen.
 

jeatock

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Government frugality vs the real world

Some agencies have built out a secure private data network for mobile data. Others use highly specialized mobile equipment with extra layers of security operating on private (usually cellular) networks. Both are built on the "spare no expense because our responders deserve the best" theory, universally promoted by their respective manufacturers. Neither are cheap. As fixed targets, they are 'hackable'. Their failsafe backup is a $5,000 voice radio operating on an equally expensive proprietary digital trunking system with 95% reliability, promoted by those same manufacturers.

Around here we use plain old cell phone text, and off-the-shelf laptops / smart phones / Ipads with off-the-shelf cellular air cards and unsecured Yahoo! messenger. Cheap, easily deployed, universally available to those 'in the loop', and 'hackable' IF you can find a moving target in the weeds surrounded by grocery lists and Facebook friend requests. Our failsafe backup is a $700 voice radio operating on an old-fashioned analog voted repeated system with 99% reliability and 100% interoperability.

Both work.

Draw your own conclusions.
 

sirsmiley

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I can say that to access government information the workstations need to be secured from end to end involving encryption and policies on the laptops, firewalls blocking all internet traffic (4G) except for site to site vpn running AES256 with certificates to and from specific IP's so good luck with that. (For Canada, your local yokels in USA small town might have a worse setup, idk)
 

ScanMaine

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I got a tough book I use in my truck when plowing in the winter to monitor weather and us my Verizon Internet hotspot on my Samsung Note 3
 
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screamin72

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No way for me to take the chance. It was good to ask the question. I value my freedom! LOL! The law says no if caught go to jail. No sir Im not even gonna entertain the thought of breaking the "E" word laws!

Thinking also that police officer's might have personal information and also personal information from people ran through Records 1 CIU and reports that prying eyes should never see. That starts to get into the realm of identifity theft. No way Im not gonna even try!

Yeah someone brave enough to break it and make it public sure will have issues with the Fed! Who in their right mind will go down that road? Don't incriminate yourself by answering this question keep the secret just that a secret!
 

phask

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Many use dedicated data channels/systems. Ohio's statewide system (MARCS) has dedicated data. It has nothing to do with any cell system. I'd guess tha many larger systems are the same, cheaper to run your own than pay cell service.

Not certain but I believe agencies can use MARC's data or voice and do not need both.
 

mancow

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Many use dedicated data channels/systems. Ohio's statewide system (MARCS) has dedicated data. It has nothing to do with any cell system. I'd guess tha many larger systems are the same, cheaper to run your own than pay cell service.

Not certain but I believe agencies can use MARC's data or voice and do not need both.
I assume that would have to be heavily encrypted wouldn't it, to adhere to NCIC and other regulations?
 
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