Public/private IP address question for streaming server

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CheezeHedInWisconsin

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I have a broadband Internet connection at home that I'd like to use for an online scanner stream. The problem is, my ISP insists that their home customers only get one public IP address. I have a Lynksis switch hooked up to that, and four computers are connected to the switch. The switch has a public IP address on the Internet-facing side, 71.XX.XXX.XXX, and all of the computers and the switch's home-facing interface have a private address, 192.168.XXX.XXX.

Using the private IP address: port as a URL won't work for a connections coming from the public Internet, and if I use the public IP address: port URL I have to take all of my other computers offline, because the computer with the streaming scanner will be connected directly to the ISP and the switch will be removed, so this way the computer will receive the public address the switch normally would have.

With as many streaming scanners as their are online, there has got to be a way around this so I can have a workable IP address for the streaming computer and still have my other computers connected. Any ideas?
 

ProScan

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To stream to RR IceCast server, nothing is needed. If running a Web Server or IceCast/Shoutcast server at home, you need a "No IP" service such as dyndns.org. There all free and it works well. Google search for "no ip".


I have a broadband Internet connection at home that I'd like to use for an online scanner stream. The problem is, my ISP insists that their home customers only get one public IP address. I have a Lynksis switch hooked up to that, and four computers are connected to the switch. The switch has a public IP address on the Internet-facing side, 71.XX.XXX.XXX, and all of the computers and the switch's home-facing interface have a private address, 192.168.XXX.XXX.

Using the private IP address: port as a URL won't work for a connections coming from the public Internet, and if I use the public IP address: port URL I have to take all of my other computers offline, because the computer with the streaming scanner will be connected directly to the ISP and the switch will be removed, so this way the computer will receive the public address the switch normally would have.

With as many streaming scanners as their are online, there has got to be a way around this so I can have a workable IP address for the streaming computer and still have my other computers connected. Any ideas?
 
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talkpair

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If you are a feed provider to RadioReference, you don't need any special configuration.

If you are running your own icecast server, then you need to configure your router to direct inbound internet traffic from port 8000 (usually) to the private IP address for that particular machine on your LAN.
Even if you were to wanted multiple streams, it still requires only one IP address.
 

Ref-Jazzy

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Ok, you do only get one public ip but that is all you need.

Your router will naturally take that public ip address. However what you now need to do is. Set up "port forwarding" which will tell the router to route requests on certain ports to your computer with the streaming server on it.

For instance, lets pretend the ip address on your streaming server is 192.168.1.15 and the software you are using runs on port 80

you would then set up port forwarding in your router to route port 80 traffic is 192.168.1.15 now when ever you put your public ip address in a web browser from another location, it will take you to your streaming server. Its like creating a pass through in the router.


Hope this helped. if you need more assistance dont hesitate to ask. Im happy to help.
 

OCO

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Reading the initial entry, the OP says he's got a switch with four PC connections.. Hopefully this isn't a case of an ISP supplied router with no customer access...Chzhed?
 

Ref-Jazzy

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he said linksys switch, I guess i just assumed router. Hopefully the modem isnt also a router, if thats the case the isp will be a pain to deal with port forwading.

Hey OP. whats the model of your linksys?
 

ProScan

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That will work if the IP is static but residential service uses dynamic IP addresses which means that the IP address can change from time to time and when the router is power cycled. Because it's dynamic, it's recommended to use a "No IP" service.

Most ISP residential service blocks incoming port 80 as the TOS prohibits running servers so the server should be set to another port.

[EDIT] An advantage of using a "No IP" service is the end user can remember a friendly name in lieu of the dot-decimal notation.

Ok, you do only get one public ip but that is all you need.

Your router will naturally take that public ip address. However what you now need to do is. Set up "port forwarding" which will tell the router to route requests on certain ports to your computer with the streaming server on it.

For instance, lets pretend the ip address on your streaming server is 192.168.1.15 and the software you are using runs on port 80

you would then set up port forwarding in your router to route port 80 traffic is 192.168.1.15 now when ever you put your public ip address in a web browser from another location, it will take you to your streaming server. Its like creating a pass through in the router.


Hope this helped. if you need more assistance dont hesitate to ask. Im happy to help.
 
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Ref-Jazzy

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I live in indianpolis, have comcast, and have portforwarding set up on my router and am hosting both my websites on a home server. I have a dynamic ip address, it rarely changes. Static ip address is best but it can me done with dynamic, you can also subscribe to a dynamic dns service, but in my exp its not needed.
 

OCO

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If it is just a switch, obviously the ISP supplied equipment is doing DHCP for him and must be pretty wide open as far as any filtering - so replacing a switch with a router and then doing the port forwarding as you outlined would still work. Betcha he's really got a Linksys router, though..

Central Michigan, Broadstripe, cable modem public address has never changed in four years..
 

CheezeHedInWisconsin

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Thanks for all the info. I'm using a Linksys router that has a 5 port switch interface, model BEF SR41 V3. I investigated further and found that it does indeed have port forwarding, but the public IP address the router uses is dynamic and not static, and that may lead to problems because I may get a new IP address if the cable connection or the power goes out and back on at a later time.

I'm fairly new to all of this and I didn't know how the RR or IceCast servers work, so I'm going to look into those options over the weekend.

Thanks again, for the tips and information, it is greatly appreciated.
 

OCO

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........................, but the public IP address the router uses is dynamic and not static, and that may lead to problems because I may get a new IP address if the cable connection or the power goes out and back on at a later time............................
Before you get too wrapped up in solving that problem, you might test to see it actually changes. A lot of the systems stress that they're serving up DHCP addresses (they are) but in actual practice the addresses stay the same for long periods of time..
 

bezking

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Before you get too wrapped up in solving that problem, you might test to see it actually changes. A lot of the systems stress that they're serving up DHCP addresses (they are) but in actual practice the addresses stay the same for long periods of time..
+1

Around here, the local ISP hands out IP addresses that basically never expire, yet they are "dynamic." I think I may have had a total of two IP addresses assigned to my account in ten years. It got to the point where some of my friends thought they were getting static IPs for free :lol:...
 

mike_s104

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+1

Around here, the local ISP hands out IP addresses that basically never expire, yet they are "dynamic." I think I may have had a total of two IP addresses assigned to my account in ten years. It got to the point where some of my friends thought they were getting static IPs for free :lol:...
Some routers will allow using a service like dyndns or similar. If your router doesn't, some services have a client you can install on a PC behind your router/firewall. A lot are free. Some paid ones have port redirect too.

They won't "hide" your IP, but simple allow for a static url that gets forwarded to your IP no matter if it does change.

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W4ELL

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I am still unsure if the OP is wanting to stream his scanner to RR or if he wants to set up a server and stream directly to the internet?

If you are wanting to set up an RR stream, you don't have to worry with port forwarding or a dynamic DNS (no IP)... you just need a streaming client like ScannerCast which does all the dirty work. In this scenario, you only have to supply one upstream 16k connection to RR then they take care of the bandwidth for all the connected streamers. RR also supplies the "advertisement" for your stream info and the means to listen to it for virtually unlimited listeners.

Setting up your own IceCast server and serving it to the internet is a horse of a different color. Not only will you have to set up port forwarding and some kind of dynamic dns (no IP) service but you will also consume more of your upstream bandwidth (depending on how many listeners you want to allow at a time). You will also need to "advertise" your connection info so that people know where to connect and listen to your feed. For most people, knowing what to do in order to listen might also be a hurdle.

Hope this helps.
 

mike_s104

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He also never posted what kind of scanner he's using. If he's using a newer Uniden, ProScan is a great option. It will do RR, icecast, record, and stream to ProScan clients & get published there too.

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