Cruise Ship Frequencies

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ecps92

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Interesting on the 3B36 TRS, I have seen some US Navy 457/467 TRS but they always used the 457 for the output side, not the 467

Thanks for the other info, adding it over the next week to the web pages, I'm thinking I need a little Vacation [soon] near a cruiseport :wink:

This is interesting one to be on the lookout for in ports or at sea:
Unidentified Motorola 3B36 Trunking System, Ship at Sea, Texas - Scanner Frequencies
Unidentified Motorola 3B36 - The RadioReference Wiki

Ships:
467.8 103.5 Bahamas Celebration (Celebration Cruise Line)
469.95 88.5 M Carnival Imagination - Bridge/Security/Excursions
467.5375 M Carnival Magic - Casino?
457.575 d 346 R Carnival Magic - Bridge/Security (main operations channel)
467.575 d 346 I Carnival Magic - Bridge/Security Input
457.55 d 212 R Carnival Magic - Engineering
464.275 d 346 M Carnival Magic - Guest Services/Excursions/Embarkation
459.65 S Carnival Magic - Paging (data)
156.225 CSQ M Carnival Magic - WaterWorks (Marine Ch. 64A) -- this is the onboard waterpark/slides
457.525 d 054 R Carnival Magic - "Safety Channel" (this is not security; it was used for emergency drills)
467.525 d 054 I Carnival Magic - "Safety Channel" Input
464.3 d 346 M Carnival Magic
467.175 156.7 M Carnival Pride - Bridge/Security
467.8 118.8 M Mariner of the Seas
467.75 97.4 M Mariner of the Seas - Ch. 5 Housekeeping
457.525 71.9 R Mariner of the Seas - Security
467.75 71.9 I Mariner of the Seas - Security Input
467.775 107.2 M Mariner of the Seas?
467.525 118.8 Emerald Princess?
 
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Lots of good info. I wish someone near the ports would set up a rr feed I would love to listen to them!

Sent from my BlackBerry using Tapatalk please excuse typographical errors
 

n1das

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My g/f and I just returned from a 5-day cruise to The Bahamas aboard the Carnival Sensation. We sailed from Port Canaveral in FL. We had Hytera PD362 portables operating in analog mode on GMRS. They worked great and are small enough and look enough like what cell phones looked like before smartphones started becoming popular. Nobody questioned them although I did notice security took a long look at mine once as I was debarking the ship on an shore excursion. I did also notice a few families were using GMRS/FRS bubble packs.

While in The Bahamas, I did scan the GMRS/FRS channels and did find a bit of local activity from bubblepacks. Aside from local bubble pack activity, the GMRS/FRS channels were totally clean. I suspect that while using GMRS/FRS outside the USA is technically not legal, the government in The Bahamas doesn't seem to care and there's nothing operating there to be interfered with.

As for freqs aboard the ship, the Carnival Sensation is operating UHF DMR, using MOTOTRBO XPR6550 UHF handhelds. The only freq I found on my BCD396XT scanner was 457.525 and it was the output of a DMR repeater. I was unable to monitor operations on the ship and did a lot of searching while in my stateroom. I had a DMR/MotoTRBO radio with me (Hytera PD362) and could have tried listening with it but I didn't have my PC and programming cable with me to try it.

The cruise was a blast and I was more focused on doing other fun stuff. Radio wasn't highest on the priority list. My g/f and I had fun free swimming and interacting and playing with dolphins in Freeport. In Nassau on Balmoral Island (seen in a 1-800-SANDALS TV commercial), we petted and fed stingrays having wingspans up to 4 feet and then hung out on the beach for a while. In Half Moon Cay we went on an Eco Lagoon tour in a glass bottom boat. Half Moon Cay marine operations were on marine channel 79 (156.975). Communications between Half Moon Cay and the Sensation were on marine channel 74 (156.725). Tenders between the Sensation and shore were also on marine channel 74. All radios spotted were Icom marine radios.

Our last day of the cruise was our fun at sea day as we headed back to Port Canaveral. The fun activity I had booked for us was an exclusive Behind the Fun tour where we were given a guided tour of the ship in areas that only the crew and officers see. The tour is offered only once during the cruise and takes a maximum of 16 people. I knew it would fill up fast so I signed up early for it. Cost was $49/person. I recall Modern Marvels on TV (History Channel) did an episode about cruise ships and visited the same areas.

We were escorted by our tour guide and a security officer at all times. Since it's all in restricted areas, no cameras or cell phone or any recording devices were allowed at all. Each of us was screened with a metal detector at the start of the tour. We visited the galley area where all food is prepped and cooked, laundry facilities, food storage spaces, and other storage spaces. The tour also included touring backstage of the theater. In each area we stopped at, the crew in charge of that area talked to us and explained what happens there. We also spent time in the crew's dining and training areas. It was interesting to learn that the wait staff in the guest dining rooms were well trained because they spend a full year below deck serving the crew and officers before they ever serve a guest. It was also interesting to learn that the ship is propelled by electric motors driving two props ("screws") at constant RPM and thrust is controlled by changing the pitch on the prop's blades. 5 (or 6?) diesel powered generators generate all electric power needed for propulsion and to run everything else. Total power generating capacity is greater than 60 MW, enough to power a small town. It is quite the operation going on behind the scenes that the guests never get to see.

The two favorites in the tour were in areas off-limits to most of the crew. These areas were the engine control room deep down on Deck 2 and up front on THE BRIDGE! We met the Captain and the First Officer on the Bridge. The First Officer led the tour. The surprise at the end of the Bridge part of the tour was a professionally done group photo of us with the Captain and First Officer and we each received a complimentary copy. This tour was VERY interesting and I highly recommend it. Motorola UHF MotoTRBO DMR portables were spotted everywhere.
 
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ecps92

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Seems most of the newer ships are converting to DMR (TRBO) as well as those under-going Refits/Rehab.



My g/f and I just returned from a 5-day cruise to The Bahamas aboard the Carnival Sensation. We sailed from Port Canaveral in FL. We had Hytera PD362 portables operating in analog mode on GMRS. They worked great and are small enough and look enough like what cell phones looked like before smartphones started becoming popular. Nobody questioned them although I did notice security took a long look at mine once as I was debarking the ship on an shore excursion. I did also notice a few families were using GMRS/FRS bubble packs.

While in The Bahamas, I did scan the GMRS/FRS channels and did find a bit of local activity from bubblepacks. Aside from local bubble pack activity, the GMRS/FRS channels were totally clean. I suspect that while using GMRS/FRS outside the USA is technically not legal, the government in The Bahamas doesn't seem to care and there's nothing operating there to be interfered with.

As for freqs aboard the ship, the Carnival Sensation is operating UHF DMR, using MOTOTRBO XPR6550 UHF handhelds. The only freq I found on my BCD396XT scanner was 457.525 and it was the output of a DMR repeater. I was unable to monitor operations on the ship and did a lot of searching while in my stateroom. I had a DMR/MotoTRBO radio with me (Hytera PD362) and could have tried listening with it but I didn't have my PC and programming cable with me to try it.

The cruise was a blast and I was more focused on doing other fun stuff. Radio wasn't highest on the priority list. My g/f and I had fun free swimming and interacting and playing with dolphins in Freeport. In Nassau on Balmoral Island (seen in a 1-800-SANDALS TV commercial), we petted and fed stingrays having wingspans up to 4 feet and then hung out on the beach for a while. In Half Moon Cay we went on an Eco Lagoon tour in a glass bottom boat. Half Moon Cay marine operations were on marine channel 79 (156.975). Communications between Half Moon Cay and the Sensation were on marine channel 74 (156.725). Tenders between the Sensation and shore were also on marine channel 74. All radios spotted were Icom marine radios.

Our last day of the cruise was our fun at sea day as we headed back to Port Canaveral. The fun activity I had booked for us was an exclusive Behind the Fun tour where we were given a guided tour of the ship in areas that only the crew and officers see. The tour is offered only once during the cruise and takes a maximum of 16 people. I knew it would fill up fast so I signed up early for it. Cost was $49/person. I recall Modern Marvels on TV (History Channel) did an episode about cruise ships and visited the same areas.

We were escorted by our tour guide and a security officer at all times. Since it's all in restricted areas, no cameras or cell phone or any recording devices were allowed at all. Each of us was screened with a metal detector at the start of the tour. We visited the galley area where all food is prepped and cooked, laundry facilities, food storage spaces, and other storage spaces. The tour also included touring backstage of the theater. In each area we stopped at, the crew in charge of that area talked to us and explained what happens there. We also spent time in the crew's dining and training areas. It was interesting to learn that the wait staff in the guest dining rooms were well trained because they spend a full year below deck serving the crew and officers before they ever serve a guest. It was also interesting to learn that the ship is propelled by electric motors driving two props ("screws") at constant RPM and thrust is controlled by changing the pitch on the prop's blades. 5 (or 6?) diesel powered generators generate all electric power needed for propulsion and to run everything else. Total power generating capacity is greater than 60 MW, enough to power a small town. It is quite the operation going on behind the scenes that the guests never get to see.

The two favorites in the tour were in areas off-limits to most of the crew. These areas were the engine control room deep down on Deck 2 and up front on THE BRIDGE! We met the Captain and the First Officer on the Bridge. The First Officer led the tour. The surprise at the end of the Bridge part of the tour was a professionally done group photo of us with the Captain and First Officer and we each received a complimentary copy. This tour was VERY interesting and I highly recommend it. Motorola UHF MotoTRBO DMR portables were spotted everywhere.
 

SkiBob

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Seems most of the newer ships are converting to DMR (TRBO) as well as those under-going Refits/Rehab.
Just a couple of weeks ago we returned from a cruise on the Carnival Sunshine. It's Carnival's newest remodeled ship. They had 3 active frequencies that were 100% analog. No digital handhelds on the boat from the crew.

It was fun to listen to them as we were trying to leave port. The captain gave orders to leave Costa Maya without 3 passengers. Just as the gangway was coming up and the ropes were being dropped they came running down the pier and got on.

We wore our radios on our hips and my sister even had a lapel mic that she wore most the time. Not a single question or hard look from the crew. As a matter of fact the head server at dinner grabbed one of our HT's and called the rest of the family to dinner.. was funny.

We used the UV5R's and BF-888S to communicate on the boat. We encountered lots of digital interference when we were docked from the FRS/GMRS/MURS frequencies. I had squelch tones set, and though we couldn't hear the interference, the freq was tied up to where it we couldn't use them effectively.

The 888's were ok to use, but had a hard time going from room to room without stepping into the hall or stairwell. The UV5R's were a little better, but still needed an elevator shaft or stair well to go from floor to floor effectively. They were hands down better then any bubble pack radio we have ever used on the boat.

We plan on hitting the Bahamas next year as we alternate between the western and eastern Caribbean.
 

n1das

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Now that we've gotten a lot of the frequencies nailed down and many ships have upgraded to DMR/TRBO, I'm also curious about the antenna system used. They're likely using one or more repeaters on the ship but what about the antennas? I would think with a single antenna somewhere, the repeater may have trouble hearing thru multiple decks like you would on simplex between portables. Do they use something like a leaky coax antenna that runs throughout the ship on all decks?

On the Carnival Sensation, Motorola UHF MotoTRBO portables were in use everywhere.
 

ecps92

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Bob, I'm in the middle of moving and re-building my shack.
Did you by-chance send those 3 Freqs/Tones/Usage ??

Getting Internet / Cable this weekend, and will be clearing 5k of emails :D

Just a couple of weeks ago we returned from a cruise on the Carnival Sunshine. It's Carnival's newest remodeled ship. They had 3 active frequencies that were 100% analog. No digital handhelds on the boat from the crew.

It was fun to listen to them as we were trying to leave port. The captain gave orders to leave Costa Maya without 3 passengers. Just as the gangway was coming up and the ropes were being dropped they came running down the pier and got on.

We wore our radios on our hips and my sister even had a lapel mic that she wore most the time. Not a single question or hard look from the crew. As a matter of fact the head server at dinner grabbed one of our HT's and called the rest of the family to dinner.. was funny.

We used the UV5R's and BF-888S to communicate on the boat. We encountered lots of digital interference when we were docked from the FRS/GMRS/MURS frequencies. I had squelch tones set, and though we couldn't hear the interference, the freq was tied up to where it we couldn't use them effectively.

The 888's were ok to use, but had a hard time going from room to room without stepping into the hall or stairwell. The UV5R's were a little better, but still needed an elevator shaft or stair well to go from floor to floor effectively. They were hands down better then any bubble pack radio we have ever used on the boat.

We plan on hitting the Bahamas next year as we alternate between the western and eastern Caribbean.
 

ecps92

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Dave, rather interesting on the Sensation as she was Analog back in Jan 2014
and Dry-dock is not till 2015 for her.

The Behind the scenes tours are nice. Altho, you pay enough, give it FREE.
I did one a few years ago, for a Fire Tour, got to use the 1 litre of water shot-gun
whcih can put out a Car Fire with only 1 Liter of water (packs a punch from the gun)

Now that we've gotten a lot of the frequencies nailed down and many ships have upgraded to DMR/TRBO, I'm also curious about the antenna system used. They're likely using one or more repeaters on the ship but what about the antennas? I would think with a single antenna somewhere, the repeater may have trouble hearing thru multiple decks like you would on simplex between portables. Do they use something like a leaky coax antenna that runs throughout the ship on all decks?

On the Carnival Sensation, Motorola UHF MotoTRBO portables were in use everywhere.
 

ericcarlson

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Preliminary notes from a recent trip. I'll have more details later.

Code:
457.525	S		Emerald Princess - Paging
457.575	R	118.8	Emerald Princess - Hotel
467.575	I	118.8	Emerald Princess - Hotel Input
457.55	R	d 243	Emerald Princess - Bridge
467.55	I	d 243	Emerald Princess - Bridge Input
457.5625	R	118.8	Emerald Princess - Engineering
467.5375	M	118.8	Emerald Princess - Accomodation
467.525	M	118.8	Emerald Princess - Casino?
467.825	S		Vision of the Seas - Paging
467.55	R	d 306	Vision of the Seas - Bridge
457.55	I	d 205	Vision of the Seas - Bridge Input
467.75	R	d 165	Vision of the Seas - Security?
467.8	R	d 503	Vision of the Seas - Engineering?
457.575	I?	d 152	Vision of the Seas - input? to 467.8?
467.8125	M	d 632	Vision of the Seas?
467.8625	M	d 606	Vision of the Seas?
467.8875	M	d 731	Vision of the Seas? - Excursions?
 

ecps92

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Nice info, especially on the PL to DPL changes on the VoS

Preliminary notes from a recent trip. I'll have more details later.

Code:
457.525    S        Emerald Princess - Paging
457.575    R    118.8    Emerald Princess - Hotel
467.575    I    118.8    Emerald Princess - Hotel Input
457.55    R    d 243    Emerald Princess - Bridge
467.55    I    d 243    Emerald Princess - Bridge Input
457.5625    R    118.8    Emerald Princess - Engineering
467.5375    M    118.8    Emerald Princess - Accomodation
467.525    M    118.8    Emerald Princess - Casino?
467.825    S        Vision of the Seas - Paging
467.55    R    d 306    Vision of the Seas - Bridge
457.55    I    d 205    Vision of the Seas - Bridge Input
467.75    R    d 165    Vision of the Seas - Security?
467.8    R    d 503    Vision of the Seas - Engineering?
457.575    I?    d 152    Vision of the Seas - input? to 467.8?
467.8125    M    d 632    Vision of the Seas?
467.8625    M    d 606    Vision of the Seas?
467.8875    M    d 731    Vision of the Seas? - Excursions?
 

ericcarlson

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Cleaned up the Vision of the Seas info a bit:
Code:
467.55	R	d 306	Vision of the Seas - Bridge
457.55	I	d 205	Vision of the Seas - Bridge Input
467.75	R	d 165	Vision of the Seas - Engineering
467.8	R	d 503	Vision of the Seas - Hotel?
457.575	I?	d 152	Vision of the Seas - input? to 467.8?
467.8125	M	d 632	Vision of the Seas - Dining Room
467.8625	M	d 606	Vision of the Seas
467.8875	M	d 731	Vision of the Seas - Shore Excursions
 

ericcarlson

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Norwegian - Pride of America:
457.525 out [82.5] unknown input - Fire Command/Response
457.55 out [118.8] 467.775 in [118.8] - Security
457.575 out [156.7] unknown input - Evacuation Coordination
457.6 out [179.9] 467.825 in [179.9] - Bridge/Engineering
Marine Ch. 77 - Tenders and Lifeboats
Most routine ship operations are via on-board cell phone system.
Dining room staff appear to be using 2-way radios.

An emergency drill used all 4 channels -- this was fun; scenario was
an armed intruder breaches security with an IED, enters the engine
room and sets an out of control large fire. Based on previous
experience on Carnival and now Norwegian, the practice is to conduct
emergency drills during one in-port day per week and there appear to
be radio channels that are only used during these drills on both
lines. I recommend setting up a radio to auto-record during the day.
 

Mork

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Breakaway

The Breakaway will be in port at the same time as the Summit. I wonder if we've ever found the Breakaway's frequencies. I imagine if we had, they'd be on your site Bill. I'll scan around.
 

ecps92

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Rumor of TRBO for the Breakaway, as someone saw a radio (but no Frequencies were submitted)

The Summit was last validated in 10.2011



The Breakaway will be in port at the same time as the Summit. I wonder if we've ever found the Breakaway's frequencies. I imagine if we had, they'd be on your site Bill. I'll scan around.
 

Mork

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Rumor of TRBO for the Breakaway, as someone saw a radio (but no Frequencies were submitted)

The Summit was last validated in 10.2011
The Summit frequencies are correct. The Breakaway was definitely digital, not receivable (other than perhaps the TRBO) on my HP-2 and 436 as of last week. No other ship was in port at the time.
 

Mork

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Celebrity Silhouette

Currently about the Silhouette. 457.575 active for a medical emergency.

457.55 actively paging data only
 

Mork

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Silouette 127.3 operations docking

also Carnival Breeze anf Holland Am Nor? in port

one is also using 457.575 dcs 454 Carnival? for operations
 
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