CW

VA3TFC

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Sep 22, 2020
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For HF CW try here. Your radio needs a BFO.

80 meters 3.5 - 4.0 MHZ
40 meters 7.0 - 7.3 MHZ
20 meters 14.0-14.35 MHZ
10 meters 28.0 - 29.7 MHZ

Good luck!
 

VA3TFC

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Sep 22, 2020
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What is a BFO? Sorry, I am new.
Don't apologize we all have to start somewhere and there is no such things as a stupid question.

A "BFO" or Beat Frequency Oscillator is a switch on a receiver that activates a circuit that will allow you to tune SSB or Single Side Band transmissions. CW is primarily transmitted in SSB. Some receivers call it the USB/LSB clarifier. I see you're using a scanner so it may not have that function.
 
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krokus

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Southeastern Michigan
Anything works, but my scanner goes as low as 25.000 MHz and as high 512.000 MHz.
There is very little CW in that frequency range, and a scanner will not receive it. You would need a receiver that has SSB, which a scanner does not.

Some hams will do MCW over FM, as a code practice session. That is playing a tone over the FM signal, instead of voice. You would need to check with the local hams, to see if any of the local clubs do this.
 

belvdr

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If you’re close to a navigational aid for aviation, you could pick those up on AM.
 

JAF27

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Oct 13, 2020
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There is very little CW in that frequency range, and a scanner will not receive it. You would need a receiver that has SSB, which a scanner does not.

Some hams will do MCW over FM, as a code practice session. That is playing a tone over the FM signal, instead of voice. You would need to check with the local hams, to see if any of the local clubs do this.
Good to know. What are your recommendations for SSB receivers? I have no clue about their prices, but would probably want something in the $75-100 range.
 

JAF27

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Don't apologize we all have to start somewhere and there is no such things as a stupid question.

A "BFO" or Beat Frequency Oscillator is a switch on a receiver that activates a circuit that will allow you to tune SSB or Single Side Band transmissions. CW is primarily transmitted in SSB. Some receivers call it the USB/LSB clarifier. I see you're using a scanner so it may not have that function.
That's good to know. I started working with radios a few weeks ago, but I have encountered some pretty terrible people on these types of forums. I always try to be as kind and respectful as possible, especially considering that this is such a small community.
 

GB46

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Feb 4, 2017
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British Columbia, Canada
I will be testing that out tonight, scanning between 108.000 MHz and the upper 117.9s. I will report back to see if I can get anything, although my closest VOR is all the way over at KTEB.
By 108 MHz, are you referring to the air band from 108 to 137 MHz? Stations there use AM. We have a local airport here, but I've never heard any VORs on those frequencies. There is one station transmitting the airport ID in CW, but that's a localizer, which uses 110.3 Mhz. As far as I know, the VORs are typically on longwave, which is below the bottom end of the AM broadcast band, for example 290 kHz (our local VOR). I don't think your scanner would go that low. Mine does, and covers the ham bands too, but it has no SSB capability.
 

jaspence

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The Icom R30 is a great all around radio for many types of listening including digital. It does not and never will have DMR unless Icom has a huge reversal in their past decisions, but it does AM, FM, WFM, USB/LSB, CW, NXDN, and P25. Coverage is from .1 MHz to 3304.999 MHz.
 

JAF27

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By 108 MHz, are you referring to the air band from 108 to 137 MHz? Stations there use AM. We have a local airport here, but I've never heard any VORs on those frequencies. There is one station transmitting the airport ID in CW, but that's a localizer, which uses 110.3 Mhz. As far as I know, the VORs are typically on longwave, which is below the bottom end of the AM broadcast band, for example 290 kHz (our local VOR). I don't think your scanner would go that low. Mine does, and covers the ham bands too, but it has no SSB capability.
I really don't know too much about it, but when we would tune VORs and got within range, we would hear CW.
 

belvdr

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By 108 MHz, are you referring to the air band from 108 to 137 MHz? Stations there use AM. We have a local airport here, but I've never heard any VORs on those frequencies. There is one station transmitting the airport ID in CW, but that's a localizer, which uses 110.3 Mhz. As far as I know, the VORs are typically on longwave, which is below the bottom end of the AM broadcast band, for example 290 kHz (our local VOR). I don't think your scanner would go that low. Mine does, and covers the ham bands too, but it has no SSB capability.
VORs are in the usual aviation band. Some near me are 117 and 112.8 MHz. NDBs, however, are in the kHz to low MHz range.

For BC, look at CYWL (Williams Lake). To the northwest is a VOR on 113.6. Also in BC, is CBBC (Campbell Lake), which has an NDB to the east on 325 kHz.

The way I can easily remember we use the NDB receiver in our local aircraft to listen to local AM stations while moving about.
 
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