Dyslexic learning CW?

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DaddyHam

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Hey all,

I just got my technician and I'm going for my general in February. I think I'll be getting a tri-band radio (HT) this week. Once I get my general I will want to start working HF bands (Not sure which radio yet) and use the HT in my car.

I'm aurally dyslexic (sound dyslexic) and 59 years old. My aural dyslexia makes hearing letters and numbers correctly hard. I'm worried that this is going to be a problem in this hobby, but I'm going for it anyway. I do want to learn Morris code and was wondering what the best way to start is and how my dyslexia might impact my learning?

Any help will be appreciated.
 

Rt169Radio

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Hi DaddyHam, congrats on getting your technician class license. Now am sure if you listen to the radio often and trying talking often am sure you can handle it just fine. Am not actually sure how to go about with learning Morse Code with your sound dyslexic, maybe someone can chime in here and explain how?
 

GrayJeep

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Learning MORSE (Samuel F.B. Morse invented it) code is a nice goal. But no longer necessary for ham radio license of any class. Many hams use electronics to translate the code for them.

Only advice I can offer is to start learning the letters as unique sounds rather than counting dots and dashes.
If you can remember vowels and consonants correctly, you might be able to remember the sound of a letter.

Sound of the letter is how one does really fast code. In fact, the words being sent start to (figuratively) print on the inside of my forehead when I'm listening to 30wpm. Counting dots and dashes causes a huge learning plateau around 10 wpm.

Good luck!
 

KC4RAF

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What you may want to try,

listen to some CW on a radio. If you know a few characters, that's a plus. Learn as much as you can. Another possible thing you could do is get a tape or dvd player and pop in a tape/disc that teaches CW. As you listen and copy, go back over what you wrote down and see that all characters are in order as transmitter. This could be a problem for you, so try to have some one with you that can help. That person doesn't have to be a Ham, it would help, but you never know that individual just might want to become a ham too. Hope my ramblin' makes sense sir; and good luck on your next test!
 

kb2vxa

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The only way to find out if dyslexia has any effect on learning code is to try it. Frankly I don't think it will because of the musical nature of the beast, it has rhythm. Songs stick in your head (ear worms) for that very reason so should the code. That brings to mind an old song; CQ Serenade.
CQ Serenade - YouTube
 

nanZor

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A great way to speed up the learning process is to actually send it, not just receive it.

Without any transmitting gear, get hold of a code practice oscillator. Get a GOOD key, something that you might want to actually use, not the junky ones. I can't emphasize that enough - get a good one because you are going to use it later - quite possibly for decades.

Some new rigs actually have practice oscillators built into them.

Get hold of any material like a magazine, newspaper, etc - your imaginary job is to send this text to someone else. Send all the characters you have learned so far, and just skip the ones you don't know. As you learn new characters, just pick up any material that has text, and send it.

The tactile and aural feedback you get from the practice of sending, reinforces what you hear while merely listening for practice. It also keeps the boredom factor down, and the interest up. Start with a hand key, and not a bug or electronic one. The reason for this is that the physical process of tapping and holding adds "feel" with a hand key and once your brain absorbs it, you can move to an electronic keyer later.

Practice sessions that consist of receiving AND sending just might overcome the aural dyslexity. Another key issue is to actually ENJOY the learning process. Take it at your own pace. When it becomes frustrating or seems like a real job, take a break.
 
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nanZor

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Forgot to mention that this is a great way for SWL's to learn CW obviously. Even if you have no intention of becoming a ham, learning to send it with an oscillator will cut your learning time down drastically. Sell the key later if you like.

Whatever you do, don't get frustrated with a piece of some stamped-metal piece of junk for a key. A precision instrument is a wise investment.
 

kb2vxa

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"Some new rigs actually have practice oscillators built into them."

Most do these days, it's called side tone. For those unfamiliar it's an adjustable audio oscillator that sends a tone to the speaker when the key is down so you can hear your own transmission. You don't need to actually transmit, it operates independently, just turn the carrier down to zero and use a dummy load to be on the safe side.
 

LtDoc

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I haven't read all the posts in this thread so I'm probably repeating what's already been said.
The best/only way to learn Morse code is by listening to it, if that's how you are going to be 'receiving' it. If you'll be 'receiving ' it by sight (light/flag) then naturally looking at it is best.
It takes practice, lots of listening, dyslexic or not. I would have to think that you will have more trouble learning it than others, but you know that to start with, right? The hardest part is learning what the characters are. THEN you can work on speed. There are several 'methods' of learning those characters, try different methods and see which works best for you. The methods that work do NOT involve translating between 'written' characters, dots/dashes. That involves going between ears/listening and sight/seeing those written dots/dashes. Listen to the stuff, don't look at it!
I think you will have to work at it more than I did, but so what? I'll bet there are things I'd have to really work at that you just 'fell into', right?
Good luck, it really isn't impossible.
- 'Doc
 

kb2vxa

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Oh my, the comedians are giving me competition again!

"Morse developed our aptly named code."
Just to be horribly pedantic Morse started the code but didn't develop it, the railroad telegraph code was rather different and with submarine cable telegraph being uncoordinated there was considerable confusion. They put their heads together and developed Continental Morse which carried over into wireless and is what we still use today.

"Morris was a cat in a television commercial."
Ah yes, that finicky Orange Tabby. Has anyone noticed the striking similarity of that lasagna lover Garfield? .... .. .... ..
 

majoco

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There are quite a few programmes around for learning morse but this one....

Software

...has many good qualities and has been used here with good success. It gets over the speed plateau by always sending the characters at a reasonable speed but with large gaps. It's free too!

Although I agree that you should learn to send too, there is a problem with that. Your brain always tells you that your morse is perfect!

The way we were taught to send was by sending along with a recorded perfect text and the instructor could listen to our sending through his console. Before this equipment was installed, we were being taught by an ex-Post Office Coast Radio operator called Percy. Then another tutor cam along who was also ex Coast Rdio operator this time from Holland. When he first heard us ending he said "Good Heavens, you all sound like Percy"! Then came the Creed punch tape machine with perfect morse! You can do the same with Gary's programme.

I have one of these...

http://www.mtechnologies.com/amplidan/

....but you don't need to go that far! :)
 

k9rzz

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Do you have any trouble understanding spoken word? If not, then I think you'll do fine.

See you the (CW) bands!
 
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