F-22 over NE AL

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CORN

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Yeah they had the darndest time trying to get a hold of Atlanta on 299.2, i think about 6 or 7 attempts before they got acknowledged. Usually the F-22 test pilot will briefly go over to the "Victor" equivelent on 133.175 to wake up the controller and get his/her UHF "on" or at least start listening closer.
 

SteveEJ

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The assumption that the controllers need to be awakened is not right. As a retired controller I know that this rarely happens. It was more likely that the transmitter on their com console was not selected on Uniform. Some keying of Uniform frequencies has a tendency to leave the squelch on for a short time after the transmitter key is released. This can be very bothering and in some cases block what else is being heard. It is routine to do this because of these reasons. You also have to factor in the age of the radios and the fact that transmitters and receivers are not co-located. Transmitter sites and reciever sites can be a mile apart if not more in some cases.
 

123

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SteveEJ

Wow a real ATC controller I have so many questions..LOL Did you work the ATL and when did you get out?
Sounds like me. Getting paid for your hobby with a twist? When you recv from aircraft can the controller tell what mtn/sector/etc etc the rx signal came from?
 

CORN

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The assumption that the controllers need to be awakened is not right. As a retired controller I know that this rarely happens. It was more likely that the transmitter on their com console was not selected on Uniform. Some keying of Uniform frequencies has a tendency to leave the squelch on for a short time after the transmitter key is released. This can be very bothering and in some cases block what else is being heard. It is routine to do this because of these reasons. You also have to factor in the age of the radios and the fact that transmitters and receivers are not co-located. Transmitter sites and reciever sites can be a mile apart if not more in some cases.
Calm down Steve, that was a figure of speech. I know they aren't asleep. The Memphis Ctr (Jackson-McKellar, 354.0) high sector has the same problems on their UHF. Their transmitter/reciever isn't the greatest. The ones i hear (Memphis @ Nashville mainly) where i can actually hear the RCAG both UHF and VHF are simulcasted by ATC. I just find it interesting they don't have the same kind of reception to hearing a UHF call as they do VHF. Thanks for clearing it up, after my sarcasm.
 

zguy1243

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Calhoun Georgia
I have some questions for the ATC controller too. I too have been listening to ATC/military comms since I was 7 years old- yeah 7, its bad.

I have heard the controller mention that they had their UHF turned down. Maybe there is a seperate volume for the UHF side. Some of my questions would be:

What ARTCC did you work at?
How much traffic really exist above FL600? and can you elaborate on some the high flyers that you have had on your scope?
Where would I get a sector map for the Atlanta center airspace? (a map that shows low and high altitude sectors with their respective frequencies)
I know that most ATC sectors have numerous receive and transmit sites. Tell us more about this. I know that some have remote receivers at airports that use center freqs for clearance delivery as a example.
Is their a military liaison officer at every ARTCC to handle mil issues in the center?

Sorry for all the questions but it is so hard to get good information anymore. Thanks in advance for any information and for keeping the skies safe in your career of service.

Jody
 
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