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Kenwood TK-790 Programming

aphoenix42

Newbie
Joined
Jul 5, 2023
Messages
2
Hello. So I have acquired two used Kenwood TK-790 with the full feature head. I can receive on them both and transmit successfully on simplex. However I don't seem to be able to get into any of my local repeaters. I am unable to find any help files for the software to sort out what these mean. I have the tx and rx frequencies put in properly. However I think the tone settings are whats throwing me off. Does anyone have the help files or can explain what the QT/DQT settings and OPT signal mean? I am so close to being able to use these I think/hope this is the last hurdle.

Any help is appreciated.

KD9YHH
 

W8UU

Pilot of the Airwaves
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Nov 22, 2007
Messages
316
Location
Wellston OH
QT and DQT are Kenwood's marketing terms for continuous tone-coded squelch and digital coded squelch. Motorola calls them "Private Line" and uses PL and DPL as the abbreviated monikers. GE called it "Channel Guard". It's all the same thing.

You'll need to find out what subaudible tone or digital code is being used on the repeaters you're wanting to access. Make sure you confirm whether a certain tone is used on transmit and receive. A few repeaters require a tone to access them but they don't transmit a tone. This is an issue because you won't be able to hear the repeater on your mobile radio unless you're monitoring in carrier squelch mode. The tone you programmed is blocking the carrier squelch repeater signal from your receiver. Other repeaters use a split tone, which means a different tone is used for transmit and receive.

You should be able to get ham frequencies and QT/DQT tones from fellow amateurs, radio clubs, or directories. If you're programming business or public safety frequencies (and you have the authority and permission to be on those frequencies) you can get the QT/DQT info from the agency's communications person or their radio vendor.

I'm honestly not sure on the OPT signal. Hopefully, another Kenwood user can fill us both in on that one.

Kenwood's TK-790 is a great radio. I own several in VHF and UHF and two of the high power remote models. You can't go wrong with the radio you chose. It's a real workhorse and they are available at very reasonable prices in the used market and online.
 

aphoenix42

Newbie
Joined
Jul 5, 2023
Messages
2
QT and DQT are Kenwood's marketing terms for continuous tone-coded squelch and digital coded squelch. Motorola calls them "Private Line" and uses PL and DPL as the abbreviated monikers. GE called it "Channel Guard". It's all the same thing.

You'll need to find out what subaudible tone or digital code is being used on the repeaters you're wanting to access. Make sure you confirm whether a certain tone is used on transmit and receive. A few repeaters require a tone to access them but they don't transmit a tone. This is an issue because you won't be able to hear the repeater on your mobile radio unless you're monitoring in carrier squelch mode. The tone you programmed is blocking the carrier squelch repeater signal from your receiver. Other repeaters use a split tone, which means a different tone is used for transmit and receive.

You should be able to get ham frequencies and QT/DQT tones from fellow amateurs, radio clubs, or directories. If you're programming business or public safety frequencies (and you have the authority and permission to be on those frequencies) you can get the QT/DQT info from the agency's communications person or their radio vendor.

I'm honestly not sure on the OPT signal. Hopefully, another Kenwood user can fill us both in on that one.

Kenwood's TK-790 is a great radio. I own several in VHF and UHF and two of the high power remote models. You can't go wrong with the radio you chose. It's a real workhorse and they are available at very reasonable prices in the used market and online

Thank you for the definitions. I was able to get it programmed from this.

I had the tones in the "QT/DQT dec" and they needed to be in "QT/DQT enc"
 

mrweather

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
1,268
If the repeaters you want to access also transmit a QT/PL tone, you can leave "QT/DQT dec" enabled with the appropriate tone frequency as an extra layer of keeping your radio quiet.
 
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