LASD unit designators

katschak

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Dec 10, 2020
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Could someone please clarify a couple of designators that are in use in the LASD for me?
is ADAM a two-man patrol car, BOY a one-man patrol car?

Also i've heard one day 20F, 20H designators and was wondering what they mean.

also doesn't the LASD use "master beat" preceding the type of unit? e.g. 20A1.

Huge thanks in advance.
 

katschak

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jrholm

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There no longer exists a difference in identifying units as one or two man cars with LASD, although the east end stations tend to carry over the old "King" car in their call signs for contract city cars (one man cars).
"Adam" normally just identifies a second car assigned to the same area.
"Boy" could mean bike, or it could mean yet another car in the same geographic area. Temple station used the B designator to identify their special assignment/problems and community relations deputies.
Charlie is always a captain. 280C, captain of Compton Station.
David, is usually the station desk/dispatcher 180David, Avalon desk/dispatcher. Temple used David for CSO's working the field, most stations designate those as Zebra units.
E and F, pick your poison, although most stations designated overlap cars as Frank units ( a car that starts halfway between shifts)
George, a station gang unit, or pick your poison.
Henry, supposed to be a mounted unit, or pick your poison, Temple used Henry as a second overlap car in the same area as another.
Ida, commander, goes back to when they were called inspectors
J, your guess is as good as mine, but they are out there
King, used to designate a one man car, still used mostly on the east end of the county, or at some stations to designate when a trainee is riding solo in the last phase of training.
Lincoln, lieutenant
Mary, motor unit
Nora, usually only heard to designate a night detective car such as 828N1, a detective working nights at Compton Station
Ocean, usually a security officer (SSO)
PaulEdward is parking enforcement
Robert is a reserve deputy
Sam sergeant
Tom, traffic car
Union, used to be utility deputy, but I don't know of any stations that still use a deputy in that spot.
Victor, civilian volunteer
some stations use Union and X-Ray to designate special overtime assignments, sometimes Edward too.
Young used to designate a unit that had a satellite phone, usually assigned out in the boonies somewhere.
Zebra is hard designated to denote a non department employee, such as Norwalk public safety that is allowed access to sheriff's communications. A lot of stations also use it to designate department CSO's assigned to work the field.

This is current as of my retirement in Aug of 2019
 

avascan522

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Sep 28, 2013
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California
I've heard William also- but only in Avalon. 180W1, which is a woman deputy who has worked at the station for a while now. However, she's not the only female deputy at the station.
 

JeremyG760

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Oceanside, CA
It is interesting to see regional variations. Down here in Oceanside, Victor is parking enforcement. The senior volunteers are Young units.

*Young is per a friend who scans. They're on hiatus as of covid.
 

katschak

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Dec 10, 2020
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@jrholm
There no longer exists a difference in identifying units as one or two man cars with LASD, although the east end stations tend to carry over the old "King" car in their call signs for contract city cars (one man cars).
"Adam" normally just identifies a second car assigned to the same area.
"Boy" could mean bike, or it could mean yet another car in the same geographic area. Temple station used the B designator to identify their special assignment/problems and community relations deputies.
Charlie is always a captain. 280C, captain of Compton Station.
David, is usually the station desk/dispatcher 180David, Avalon desk/dispatcher. Temple used David for CSO's working the field, most stations designate those as Zebra units.
E and F, pick your poison, although most stations designated overlap cars as Frank units ( a car that starts halfway between shifts)
George, a station gang unit, or pick your poison.
Henry, supposed to be a mounted unit, or pick your poison, Temple used Henry as a second overlap car in the same area as another.
Ida, commander, goes back to when they were called inspectors
J, your guess is as good as mine, but they are out there
King, used to designate a one man car, still used mostly on the east end of the county, or at some stations to designate when a trainee is riding solo in the last phase of training.
Lincoln, lieutenant
Mary, motor unit
Nora, usually only heard to designate a night detective car such as 828N1, a detective working nights at Compton Station
Ocean, usually a security officer (SSO)
PaulEdward is parking enforcement
Robert is a reserve deputy
Sam sergeant
Tom, traffic car
Union, used to be utility deputy, but I don't know of any stations that still use a deputy in that spot.
Victor, civilian volunteer
some stations use Union and X-Ray to designate special overtime assignments, sometimes Edward too.
Young used to designate a unit that had a satellite phone, usually assigned out in the boonies somewhere.
Zebra is hard designated to denote a non department employee, such as Norwalk public safety that is allowed access to sheriff's communications. A lot of stations also use it to designate department CSO's assigned to work the field.

This is current as of my retirement in Aug of 2019
Thank you I really appreciate your efforts here. So how would one identify a third or fourth, fifth... car assigned to the same area? Just been wondering. What rank usually David is - station desk/dispatcher? Thank you in advance.
 

jrholm

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Aug 22, 2006
Messages
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Big Bear
@jrholm

Thank you I really appreciate your efforts here. So how would one identify a third or fourth, fifth... car assigned to the same area? Just been wondering. What rank usually David is - station desk/dispatcher? Thank you in advance.
The station dispatcher is usually a civilian. But they sit right next to the station watch deputy, who may also be using that radio with the same call sign. That deputy is a bonus I position (two stripes, titles vary according to the bonus position, at a station the most common bonus I positions are Watch Deputy, Field Training Officer, and Detective. Bonus I's are still called deputy but receive a 5.5% pay increase for their additional duties. Although FTO's who train beyond a year are automatically promoted to Senior Field Training Officers and their pay gets bumped up by 11%, still just 2 stripes)
 

jrholm

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Aug 22, 2006
Messages
562
Location
Big Bear
I've heard William also- but only in Avalon. 180W1, which is a woman deputy who has worked at the station for a while now. However, she's not the only female deputy at the station.
Deputy Austin is a watch deputy. Watch deputies at Avalon don't normally sit at the desk like they do at other stations though. Their position is more admin and collateral to their regular patrol duties, due to the small staffing levels.
 

PaulNDaOC

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Messages
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Location
Orange County,Ca
@jrholm

Thank you I really appreciate your efforts here. So how would one identify a third or fourth, fifth... car assigned to the same area? Just been wondering. What rank usually David is - station desk/dispatcher? Thank you in advance.
There is no firm rule on deploying cars and stations are free to designate the units as s they wish with some restrictions many of which you have already seen.
The numbers are geographic with some cities having all their cars having the same number and a letter or letter followed by a number which indicates things like function, start time and more.
There are other areas including contract cities that have split a city into patrol beats with the number indicating the beat such as in Compton there are four 281-284, West Hollywood 91-93, Carson 164-168, Cerritos 231-235, East L.A. 21-24, and so on, then there is Paramount that has a beat system indicated by the letter after 136.
I would be depriving you of all the fun of figuring it out further by getting more specific, but it is very possible if you pay attention.
 
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