• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

Setting up I-maxx 2000, How can I set it up to be most efficient?

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JayMojave

Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2007
Messages
678
Location
Mojave Ca
Hello Warren and PRCGUY: Great postings!

Using the 5/8 wavelength vertical antenna was what I was alo thinking, and the RCA 1937 paper (I think) that RCA published about ground plan radials that the FCC adopted.

I have a 5/8 wavelength ground plane antenna at about 30 feet at the bottom, and a 5 element yagi beam at about 60 Ft, that work quit well. I use the beam for rejection of strong stations out of the East so that I can hear the weaker stations out of the south pacific areas.

A 5/8 full blown lenth at 41 Feet for 20 meters on top of a 60 Foot tower worked so well I took it down as it was like shooting fish in a barrel, no fun, it worked to well. Guys in NY were asking to turn off my little 800 watt linear.

Again great posts.

Jay in the Mojave
 

LtDoc

Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2006
Messages
2,145
Location
Oklahoma
"Ideal" height for an antenna depends on a lot of factors, the frequency of use, and just how practical is it to get the thing to whatever height. The 'best' height for YOU is the highest YOU can get the thing and stay practical. If that amounts to 15 - 20 feet, and that's the 'best' height YOU can manage, then that's YOUR 'ideal' height. Sure, 150 - 200 feet would be nicer, but who can do that? I wish I could!
The 'ideal' height also changes with the state of propagation. What would be great one day may not be so good the next (that's both higher and lower). Somewhere in all that there's a point where the feed line losses make more height impractical, just something else to think about. If I ever get something that high I'll be sure to tell everybody about it! (While I wipe all those 'alligator' tears off my cheeks. ;))
- 'Doc
 
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