Wireless Router Help

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portroyalbirdy

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Okay, here is a little background info at my fire house we have two buildings one is our social hall (our old fire house which is now used as the social/bingo hall) We have a DSL internet modem/router combo in our social hall, we then have about 125 feet of CAT 5 ran to the other station (through conduit) to a 2nd wireless router. The SSID's are different but it seems like the two are fighting each other. When members get on in the station at the same time and load content, such as YouTube it takes FOREVER to load! I've tried what they call "cascading" the two but when as soon as I turn off the DHCP setting as it states, the 2nd router kicks off and I have to master reset. Also, I've been trying to do all of this through the web - based admin. panel. Am I able to do that? or does it have to be wired? Also came across the term of "bridging". Is that what I need to do? Any help will be GREATLY appreciated!!!
 

QDP2012

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No. Bridging is not what you want. Bridging is a special configuration used only to connect one location(building) to another location(building). It does not support client-connections (meaning you and your friends' computers). Bridging is like running a network-cable between buildings, but without the cable. You already have the cable in-place, so bridging would be pointless. The cable is better anyway.

Since you have a wired connection between buildings, the simplest way to resolve this would be to replace the second ROUTER with a simple ACCESS POINT (AP). This way, the AP will provide wireless coverage, and still be on the same IP address scheme as the primary building. This will allow convenient network-printing, file-sharing, etc. between buildings, and allow wireless users to walk between buildings without having to change IP network addresses, etc.

With regards to having two wireless transmitters within range of each other, you might want to make sure that they are on different radio-channels. The admin software should allow you to adjust this. The web interface is almost always sufficient for maintaining consumer-grade wireless equipment. Making admin-changes is easier with a cable, but can be done wirelessly most of the time.

One point of caution, which you might already have considered and dealt with, is that indoor-rated cable (run between buildings) is much more susceptible to lightning strikes and other electrical surges carried through the ground, and can lead to electrocution-type events for people on either end of the cable. Even though the cable is in conduit, consult wiring-professionals to confirm whether or not you should use exterior-grade cable between buildings.

Hope this helps,
 
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portroyalbirdy

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Thanks for the info!!! The 2nd router is an Cisco Linksys E1200. Is it possible to make that an access point?
 

CapStar362

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how big of an area of coverage are we talking about?

dont know if you guys want two different SSID's, but this sounds like a repeater situation is needed. if you use a repeater label each SSID appropriate. like Fire house for the main, and Hall for the second.

if NOT, there is a router out there ( i use this one personally to fully cover a 4700 sq Ft house and a 1 acre yard ) that uses Commercial grade power but is labeled for end user applications.

Amped Wireless R10000G High Power Wireless-N 600mW Gigabit Router - Newegg.com

The Amped Wireless R10000G is a very nice choice for covering an area equal to a 10000 Sq Ft warehouse. or if you want to save some $$$ because i KNOW DSL will not touch Gbit speeds. get the R10000 10/100MBit version here:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833281011

using 600mW of power and high gain 5dbi Antenna's ( with options for even higher on ebay and places of the such ) like i said above, my 4700 sq ft house and just .02 shy of a full acre yard has nothing less than 3 of 5 bars ANYWHERE on my property. and i LOVE it!


now: for giggles and poops...........

you want to keep the DSL Gateway? then grab a Amped repeater.... the SR10000 and let it create a repeated signal from your original, and create a secondary network as well. just make sure you put the repeater on the closest wall to the original DSL Gateway. it will grab the original network signal, repeat it, then create a secondary signal for the second part of your network.

both will co-exist on the same DSL Signal


the real cool thing about these devices... the repeater will allow you to create a secondary WiFi...AND....use up to 5 Ethernet Wired devices too!
 
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wtp

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overlap

wifi channels are 20mhz wide
and are spaced 5mhz apart
so using ch 1 and ch11 are good choices
if you need or are around 3 wifi's
then use 1,6,and 11.
avoid the overlap! it slows things d o w n .
 

QDP2012

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So according to this, I do need to put it in bridge mode correct?
In this case, yes, per the user manual, use bridge-mode on the second router.

In this case, the bridge is wired, where the one I described earlier was wireless. My point earlier was that if the bridge connection was wireless, then mobile devices could not use it directly; an access-point would still be required.

Since your secondary-router can still act as an access-point while in bridge-mode, it should let you extend coverage as you described initially, without needing separate bridge and AP units. By choosing "bridge" mode, this one unit should do both functions.


Also, please notice in the manual where it lists:
While in Bridge Mode, the following browser-based utility pages
will be unavailable:
  • Setup tab: IPv6 Setup, DDNS, MAC Address Clone, Advanced Routing
  • Security tab: all pages
  • Access Restrictions tab: all pages
  • Applications & Gaming tab: all pages
  • Administration tab: Log

Security settings will need to be managed in the primary unit.

Hope this helps,
 

CapStar362

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can be done easily, its just more hassle.....every time the router reboots and other things.


now INITIAL setup should be done over cable....because no security is in place...but once you get WPA2 or whatever encryption established then its perfectly fine with the added hassle if you want to deal with it.
 

QDP2012

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can be done easily, its just more hassle.....every time the router reboots and other things.


now INITIAL setup should be done over cable....because no security is in place...but once you get WPA2 or whatever encryption established then its perfectly fine with the added hassle if you want to deal with it.
Even though WPA2 is the "current" consumer-grade security protocol, it was cracked/hacked years ago, and is not considered secure by professional network administrators. (At the enterprise-level, AAA servers, etc. are used to help offset the weaknesses of WPA2.) Even though it is technicallly possible to do so wirelessly, routers and managed-switches should not be administered/managed wirelessly because sniffers, etc. can collect and compromise the passwords/pass-phrases, etc. Wired connections are always recommended for network-management, even after security-settings have been configured properly.

Hope this helps,
 
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portroyalbirdy

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Where I'm located its a very VERY rural community!!!! We JUST got DSL a few years ago! Before it was stone age Dial Up! No offence, but people in this town don't know how to hack into stuff like that! They are amazed when I tell them that they don't have use the phone company's provided password and make it something easy for them, yet difficult for others. And when I first started this project I set up the 2nd router through the web - based admin panel and it was unsecured the first thing I did was change that!
 

Kingmobileaudio

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bridge mode is what the router needs to be in at the end of the station. not the modem router.

bridge mode lets the other router route the Ip address. and the one at the end of the station is just an access point.

Also the chs need to be set as far apart as they can. also the access point at the end of the station needs a static IP address set to the routers ip range.

so lets say the ip is 192.168.1.1 the norm ip range is 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.150.

I setup my AP to 192.168.1.100

If the other router at the end of the station is not in bridge mode it will put out an IP address and this is BAD!



here are some photos

here is bridge mode kinda. The router can be wireless too
ALSO look how they have the cable plug in. PLUG INTO THE LAN NOT THE LAN
http://kbserver.netgear.com/images/1496_diagram.gif



here is bridge linking like he was talking about.NOT WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE
http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j140/david12857/DD-WRT/WirelessBridge.png


this is what should have been added. this is a AP with a Switch
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833281039
 
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poltergeisty

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Even though WPA2 is the "current" consumer-grade security protocol, it was cracked/hacked years ago, and is not considered secure by professional network administrators. (At the enterprise-level, AAA servers, etc. are used to help offset the weaknesses of WPA2.) Even though it is technicallly possible to do so wirelessly, routers and managed-switches should not be administered/managed wirelessly because sniffers, etc. can collect and compromise the passwords/pass-phrases, etc. Wired connections are always recommended for network-management, even after security-settings have been configured properly.

Hope this helps,

Add a full 64 random hexadecimal character password key and WPA2 is virtually uncrackable. You can only brute force WPA2. I have tried. https://www.grc.com/passwords.htm


I have tried to configure things in the router wirelessly and sometimes depending on what settings you are messing with the router could freeze and require router reset. Some things non-WIFI related can be adjusted wirelessly, but change channels wirelessly and or a password and your looking for trouble. Not only that but you can inadvertently configure your neighbors router too.
 

KB0VWG

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Lyford, Texas
You have gotten great help.

Okay, here is a little background info at my fire house we have two buildings one is our social hall (our old fire house which is now used as the social/bingo hall) We have a DSL internet modem/router combo in our social hall, we then have about 125 feet of CAT 5 ran to the other station (through conduit) to a 2nd wireless router. The SSID's are different but it seems like the two are fighting each other. When members get on in the station at the same time and load content, such as YouTube it takes FOREVER to load! I've tried what they call "cascading" the two but when as soon as I turn off the DHCP setting as it states, the 2nd router kicks off and I have to master reset. Also, I've been trying to do all of this through the web - based admin. panel. Am I able to do that? or does it have to be wired? Also came across the term of "bridging". Is that what I need to do? Any help will be GREATLY appreciated!!!
I will just tell you I have similar setup. My main router acts as the dhcp server to another router that is 3/4 Mile away. The second router acts as a AP with the dhcp turned off. There are no cables from router 1 to router 2. I use 2 Ubiquiti wireless bridges that connect both routers together, and the ubiquiti devices are on the 5Ghz band so it wont interfere with the 2.4Ghz side The second router has an ethernet coming from the ubiquiti wireless bridge to port 1 of the router not the internet port of the second router.

kb0vwg
wqoi992
 

portroyalbirdy

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bridge mode is what the router needs to be in at the end of the station. not the modem router.

bridge mode lets the other router route the Ip address. and the one at the end of the station is just an access point.

Also the chs need to be set as far apart as they can. also the access point at the end of the station needs a static IP address set to the routers ip range.

so lets say the ip is 192.168.1.1 the norm ip range is 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.150.

I setup my AP to 192.168.1.100

If the other router at the end of the station is not in bridge mode it will put out an IP address and this is BAD!



here are some photos

here is bridge mode kinda. The router can be wireless too
ALSO look how they have the cable plug in. PLUG INTO THE LAN NOT THE LAN
http://kbserver.netgear.com/images/1496_diagram.gif



here is bridge linking like he was talking about.NOT WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE
http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j140/david12857/DD-WRT/WirelessBridge.png


this is what should have been added. this is a AP with a Switch
Newegg.com - Amped Wireless APA20 High Power 700mW Dual Band AC Wi-Fi Access Point

So I would connect the CAT5 in the station to the Ethernet port on on the Cisco (2nd router) and set the 2nd router to bridge mode???
 
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