Is CHP Going P25 and/or Encrypted?

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Remember that I am new to this and trying to learn as quickly as I can so if I don't say something quite right please help me learn. Fair enough?

I elected to use a discone antenna and found that it's not very good on CHP. I don't really want to listen to any other law enforcement accept them. I was doing some research to see what frequencies they had and what kind of equipment they were using which as I get more into ham radio I'm finding myself interested in.

To make a long story short, I read that CHP is switching all divisions to the Kenwood 5600HB. When I looked up the Kenwood 5600HB the first thing I noticed is its capabilities of P25 Phase 1 and Phase 2 and different levels of encryption.

But the question I think is clear. Are they going to encrypt? I've read the rules and I'm not asking about justification one way or another to encrypt.

https://www.ameradio.com/doc/Kenwood-NX-5600HB-brochure.pdf

I may have answered my own question while trying to find the link above to post.

JVCKENWOOD to Provide Professional Digital Radio Systems to the California Highway Patrol through Collaboration with U.S. Communication System Subsidiary | JVCKENWOOD Corporation

But it doesn't say anything about encryption. Is it logical to assume that since law enforcement throughout the state is encrypting, so will CHP?
 

mmckenna

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Remember that I am new to this and trying to learn as quickly as I can so if I don't say something quite right please help me learn. Fair enough?

I elected to use a discone antenna and found that it's not very good on CHP. I don't really want to listen to any other law enforcement accept them. I was doing some research to see what frequencies they had and what kind of equipment they were using which as I get more into ham radio I'm finding myself interested in.

To make a long story short, I read that CHP is switching all divisions to the Kenwood 5600HB. When I looked up the Kenwood 5600HB the first thing I noticed is its capabilities of P25 Phase 1 and Phase 2 and different levels of encryption.

But the question I think is clear. Are they going to encrypt? I've read the rules and I'm not asking about justification one way or another to encrypt.

https://www.ameradio.com/doc/Kenwood-NX-5600HB-brochure.pdf

I may have answered my own question while trying to find the link above to post.

JVCKENWOOD to Provide Professional Digital Radio Systems to the California Highway Patrol through Collaboration with U.S. Communication System Subsidiary | JVCKENWOOD Corporation

But it doesn't say anything about encryption. Is it logical to assume that since law enforcement throughout the state is encrypting, so will CHP?
The NX-5600HB does not do P25. All the other radios in NX-5000 line can, but not the low band deck. It'll -only- do Analog and NXDN.
I should also point out that the recent large purchase of 3000+ new radios for the CHP included the Kenwood/EFJohnson multideck radio platform based off the NX-5000. That includes a 5600 low band deck, 5700 VHF deck, a 5800 UHF deck, and a 5900 700/800MHz deck. So, yes, they are getting new low band radios, but they'll still have VHF/UHF/700/800 capability.

CHP has a very large radio system covering nearly every corner of the state. That's a lot of radio sites, and 3000+ mobile radios. Unlikely they'll be replacing any of the fixed equipment in the near future. Unlikely they'll switch to NXDN, either, as their current purchase from Kenwood was for mobile radios only, not any repeaters. There's still a crap-ton of analog base stations/repeaters out there that would need to be changed out.

The State of California is slowly building out a 700MHz trunked radio system to provide for interoperability between agencies. That 700MHz system will never cover the state like low band does. The 700MHz system will be P25 and include encryption.

To add to the confusion, the State DOJ is starting to require agencies move away from passing any personal identifying information (DL number, DOB, Name, Address, etc) over the radio in an unencrypted fashion. That does NOT mean that CHP will go encrypted, it just means that they will have to find a different way of running that data. Could be over their computer terminals, or other encrypted channels.

Your best bet is to get a dedicated low band antenna and enjoy CHP in all it's low band/analog glory.
 

wowologist

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Cheap and dirty/frugal way...buy a cheap mag mount CB antenna and find a large cookie sheet (not aluminum) from a garage/yard sale/second hand store and toss the antenna on top of it as high as the coax that comes with it (will usually be 18') will extend. I used that setup, old K40 (fir forestry/CHP and ...) for decades when our local FD was on 33.920 many, many years ago. (worked so go on summertime nights I used to hear skip from mid central US dept's using the same freqs.)
 

gmclam

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I am using a discone and have no complaints about my CHP reception. I do monitor mobile frequencies as well as all the others. From where I am I usually receive: Black, Gold, Green, White (Stockton), Brown (Chico), Gray, Turquoise. Ruby, Maroon, Emerald and White (Ukiah) are at the edges of reception. The only channel I'd like to hear that I don't usually attempt is Yellow.

It's as much about location as anything. If you literally only want VHF low band there are other choices. Since I monitor all the bands, I can't see a better solution for myself (as it would likely also require dedicating specific radios to a separate antenna).
 
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A Childs VHF Lo-Band on eBay. 40-88mhz. You specify the frequency and the guy custom makes it. I just bought one. My wife is going to kill me. She doesn't understand that I got the radio bug. She said she doesn't want her house looking like a damn Space Station. LOL.

I don't understand if JVC / Kenwood has agreed to build out a digital system for CHP how their low-band radios that were pretty much custom made for them won't be digital. You explained that they were analog or NXDN what you don't know what NXDN is. But I think we missed an answer to the overall question.

Based on what I've read APCO standards are encrypted communications. The 5600HP from what I've read but barely understand is capable of encryption with or without being digital.

Will they encrypt their communications?

I guess it will be a wait-and-see. I'm not going to buy a separate scanner just for CHP. I really only want to hear things down here in Southern Riverside County but I know that they talk on talk around which is their channel 2. From what I have read on some of the CHP sites they have a special microphone where if they press on the top of the PTT button it goes through the repeater and if they press on the bottom of the button it goes on talk around.
 

mmckenna

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I don't understand if JVC / Kenwood has agreed to build out a digital system for CHP how their low-band radios that were pretty much custom made for them won't be digital.
The current contract was for the mobile radio equipment only. They're still running their Midland low band analog base station/repeaters at the sites I've been to. The NX-5600H being sold by Kenwood will only do Analog or NXDN right now. They currently do not support P25 or DMR on that specific model. I'm sure if they wanted to add it, it would be a firmware upgrade and feature license option. Kenwood also sells these same RF decks under the EF Johnson name with slightly different features. Kenwood is the parent company of EF Johnson, so it's entirely possible that while the CHP contract is with Kenwood, that they may be getting Kenwood labeled gear, EF Johnson labeled gear, or a combination of the two. I am not aware of an EF Johnson version of the NX-5600 RF deck

You explained that they were analog or NXDN what you don't know what NXDN is. But I think we missed an answer to the overall question.
I do know what NXDN is. I run an NXDN trunked system and a few hundred NXDN radios. I've talked with the Kenwood factory rep a few times about the CHP system. @kd4efm is aware of the system, and he can likely confirm what I've told you. NXDN is one of several digital modes used in the LMR industry. The Midland base station/repeaters currently in use by CHP are not NXDN capable. We don't know what the future holds, but replacing all the base station/repeater infrastructure to support NXDN would be a big job. Right now there are no low band NXDN capable repeaters in Kenwood or Icom offerings. If someone else is going to produce one, I haven't heard anything about it. Of course it's entirely possible that there would be a P25 upgrade to the NX-5600 radios down the road, but so far that's just speculation on my part. There hasn't been anything from Kenwood/EFJ that suggests that.

Based on what I've read APCO standards are encrypted communications. The 5600HP from what I've read but barely understand is capable of encryption with or without being digital.
Not really an APCO standard. AES-256 has been around for a while and is used by many companies and agencies. The radio can support AES-256 in analog mode. It can also support the NXDN 15 bit encryption that is included with the NXDN radios across the product line, as well as also running AES-256 on the NXDN side. AES-256 is supported by the RF decks, it's just a licensed feature.

Will they encrypt their communications?
I guess it will be a wait-and-see. I'm not going to buy a separate scanner just for CHP. I really only want to hear things down here in Southern Riverside County but I know that they talk on talk around which is their channel 2. From what I have read on some of the CHP sites they have a special microphone where if they press on the top of the PTT button it goes through the repeater and if they press on the bottom of the button it goes on talk around.
Yeah, encryption on low band is anyones guess at this point. The current mandate from CA DOJ doesn't require any agency to go encrypted.

As for the double PTT mic, Kenwood doesn't offer one, but who knows what cool stuff has been cooked up for that contract. I do know they have begun installing the new radio systems in the new vehicles that are hitting the roads.
 
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The current contract was for the mobile radio equipment only. They're still running their Midland low band analog base station/repeaters at the sites I've been to. The NX-5600H being sold by Kenwood will only do Analog or NXDN right now. They currently do not support P25 or DMR on that specific model. I'm sure if they wanted to add it, it would be a firmware upgrade and feature license option. ...
The reason I came and asked this question to begin with was that I came across a website that said specifically that CHP was installing P25 capable equipment. For the life of me I cannot find that website again. I didn't think to bookmark it because I didn't think it was really going to be an issue. I don't know what goes into building these radios and I am still working on getting my ham license. I'm a complete rookie. I know what a repeater is and how they work in theory but actually building one is beyond me.

I do know from my reading that low-band is really an underused band except for municipal agencies like utilities, the military, Department of Energy and a few others I found. I know that the band has issues with noise and when skip is in it can be unreliable. I know the band has the capability of being long-range compared to the others that are relatively short-range like 800. I've learned that they put those systems together kind of like large area cell phone systems. That was another thing I read was from the FCC instructing system builders to utilize lower power, shorter range but multisite systems. I guess because they're running out of frequencies. But with low-band being so unpopular I guess it's why nobody makes repeaters.

The point I'm getting at is that I understand that there aren't really manufacturers and so your point about repeaters is accepted. My ham radio Elmer took me to a repeater site and and I walked into this building and I was looking at all this stuff and like okay. What's it all do? LOL. I saw Motorola radios and various other things that were put together as repeaters. I won't make such an absurd statement is to say that a state agency would take mobile radios and make repeaters out of them but at the same time I can imagine that for enough money Kenwood could do it.

In my research I came across the fact that CHP has to put in or update 277 sites as part of their new digital operations and I know that they have more than one channel at each site that's a repeater. That means they could need a couple thousand repeaters. I would think that once again when it comes down to money Kenwood could easily build the repeaters or under the EF Johnson name? I don't know who EF Johnson is. I remember back when I was a kid my uncle had a Johnson CB radio. It was like this six channel box the size of a toolbox. My overall point is that I don't think that given the directives by APCO that law enforcement agencies switch to P25 that CHP isn't headed in that direction. I didn't bookmark that page either. Like you said, it could be as simple as a firmware upgrade that I already know from checking out scanners it's a simple process. I'm sure it's not quite as simple on a two-way radio but possible.

I did read up on NXDN and see that it is a technology invented by Kenwood and Icom and it's supposed to sound better than P25. But P25 had become the public safety standard. Again the point being as I return to the statement that I'm sure Kenwood could build P25 repeaters. My Elmer was telling me that most repeaters these days are nothing but a couple of mobiles put into a box with a controller. Like the DMR radios he was showing me. They look fancy on the outside but he said just what I wrote. Just a couple of mobiles put inside of a box. My guess is that Kenwood has the building blocks to build low-band repeaters with P25. But what do I know? My biggest concern is whether or not they employ encryption which doesn't require from what I've read P25 or any other digital method.

Thank you for your help. I've learned a lot already. I've had to go out and look up the different terms to understand what they are.
 

scannerboy02

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I think the information you saw about the site upgrades are/were for the CHP 700 MHz LMR radio system, although they also did a lot of low band site upgrades several years ago when the moved away from 42.xx for both the base and mobile frequencies. They do have a 700 MHz system in place at all of the CHP area offices and several other sites that allow the officers to talk with dispatch on 700 MHz P25. This system was intended to be used with the 700 MHz P25 portable radios while the officer was out of the car at the area office. I have heard this system in use several times both while an officer was out at the office on a portable and on a mobile when an officer was having trouble getting out on the low band channel. The system has rather good coverage around the area offices (at least the North Sacramento office) and is usable on a mobile radio for some distance from the office.

Not to make things more confusing but the CHP low band system isn't really a repeater either, they have remote transmitters and remote receivers and the audio from the receiver(s) can be retransmitted via the dispatch console out to a remote transmitter. The dispatcher can turn the retransmitting of the received audio on and off.
 

mmckenna

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The reason I came and asked this question to begin with was that I came across a website that said specifically that CHP was installing P25 capable equipment. For the life of me I cannot find that website again. I didn't think to bookmark it because I didn't think it was really going to be an issue. I don't know what goes into building these radios and I am still working on getting my ham license. I'm a complete rookie. I know what a repeater is and how they work in theory but actually building one is beyond me.
Yeah, there's the other 700MHz P25 stuff at the stations, but it's low power. Unless you are close to a station, you likely won't hear it. You could pick up the mobile extenders on 700MHz P25, but again, only if they are close by. The mobile extenders are only intended for short range.

The frequencies used by CHP are close to the Amateur Radio 6 meter band, so some of what you'll learn will apply.

I do know from my reading that low-band is really an underused band except for municipal agencies like utilities, the military, Department of Energy and a few others I found. I know that the band has issues with noise and when skip is in it can be unreliable. I know the band has the capability of being long-range compared to the others that are relatively short-range like 800. I've learned that they put those systems together kind of like large area cell phone systems. That was another thing I read was from the FCC instructing system builders to utilize lower power, shorter range but multisite systems. I guess because they're running out of frequencies. But with low-band being so unpopular I guess it's why nobody makes repeaters.
Yeah, low band has some drawbacks. Portable low band radios are hard to make work well. The antennas would need to be physically long to work well, and the radio chassis doesn't provide a very good counterpoise. That's why CHP uses the mobile extenders. Back many years ago they were using VHF for that system, 154.905, if I recall correctly. It was analog and easily heard on most scanners, so if you kept that frequency in your radio, you'd always know if there was a CHP car working locally.

Low band suffers from a high noise floor, and like you said, when the atmospheric conditions are right it can carry very far. Not uncommon for people in the mid-west or east coast to pick up CHP traffic when conditions are right.

There are still companies that make low band repeaters. They just are not very common. There is at least one company making P25 capable low band repeaters.

The point I'm getting at is that I understand that there aren't really manufacturers and so your point about repeaters is accepted. My ham radio Elmer took me to a repeater site and and I walked into this building and I was looking at all this stuff and like okay. What's it all do? LOL. I saw Motorola radios and various other things that were put together as repeaters. I won't make such an absurd statement is to say that a state agency would take mobile radios and make repeaters out of them but at the same time I can imagine that for enough money Kenwood could do it.
Amateurs will often make repeaters out of a pair of mobile radios set up back to back. It can work well if the power is turned down and there is good air flow. Commercial two way radios are usually designed around the 90-5-5 rule. 90% sitting doing nothing. 5% receiving, 5% transmitting. Much more and heat becomes a challenge. Not an insurmountable challenge, but something that needs to be addressed.
On the flip side, amateurs can be quite long winded and tie up repeaters nearly 100% transmit time when they are really going, so using a commercial mobile requires bringing the TX power down and adding good airflow over the heat sinks to keep them healthy.

Kenwood used to make a low band repeater built off their TK-690 mobile. They cranked the power way down and used an external power amplifier that was larger, had bigger heat sinks and fans. They could do the same thing with the NX-5600 easily. I haven't seen anything from Kenwood to suggest they are doing that, but maybe they just haven't told us.

In my research I came across the fact that CHP has to put in or update 277 sites as part of their new digital operations and I know that they have more than one channel at each site that's a repeater. That means they could need a couple thousand repeaters. I would think that once again when it comes down to money Kenwood could easily build the repeaters or under the EF Johnson name? I don't know who EF Johnson is. I remember back when I was a kid my uncle had a Johnson CB radio. It was like this six channel box the size of a toolbox. My overall point is that I don't think that given the directives by APCO that law enforcement agencies switch to P25 that CHP isn't headed in that direction. I didn't bookmark that page either. Like you said, it could be as simple as a firmware upgrade that I already know from checking out scanners it's a simple process. I'm sure it's not quite as simple on a two-way radio but possible.
EFJ is a big company and they were merged with Kenwood many years ago. EFJ has made a lot of radios over their time, CB, amateur, commercial, etc. Story is Kenwood bought up EFJ to get their P25 infrastructure products. Kenwood does sell some P25 repeaters under their name, but if you were to buy a big system, it would be EFJ. Some of the products are identical, just different firmware. EFJ has some licenses to sell Motorola SmartZone compatible radios, so that has been kept separate from the Kenwood branded products.

APCO is an industry group and does develop standards, but they do not have the authority to require agencies to do anything with their radio systems. The P25 stuff has been driven by the federal government by requiring radios purchased with federal grant funds be P25 capable. It does not require agencies use P25. It's been done in the name of interoperability. If an agency doesn't purchase radios with federal grant funds, then there is no requirement to go P25. Many agencies have gone to DMR or NXDN for their needs. It's cheaper, and federal grant money can be hard to get.


I did read up on NXDN and see that it is a technology invented by Kenwood and Icom and it's supposed to sound better than P25. But P25 had become the public safety standard. Again the point being as I return to the statement that I'm sure Kenwood could build P25 repeaters.
Yes. Like I said, the TKR-690 repeater was based off the TK-690 mobile cranked down to lower power, added an external amplifier and control system. No reason at all that Kenwood couldn't do that with the NX-5600, and update firmware to allow P25.
But there are already other companies that produce P25 capable low band repeaters. So, not a technical challenge, they just need someone to buy the stuff. So far no word from CHP on them upgrading the Low Band network.

My Elmer was telling me that most repeaters these days are nothing but a couple of mobiles put into a box with a controller. Like the DMR radios he was showing me. They look fancy on the outside but he said just what I wrote. Just a couple of mobiles put inside of a box.
On the amateur and low end commercial side, absolutely.
On the higher tier commercial and public safety side, repeaters are specifically built products that are designed from the ground up to be a repeater. The control interfaces are different, they often have higher tolerance oscillators, more heat sinks, separate RX and TX antenna ports, different power supplies, etc.



My guess is that Kenwood has the building blocks to build low-band repeaters with P25. But what do I know? My biggest concern is whether or not they employ encryption which doesn't require from what I've read P25 or any other digital method.
Yes, they absolutely do have what they need to make them. There is/was at least one other manufacturer selling P25 capable low band repeaters as of a few years ago, and Midland has what they need to make them also.

Not a stretch of the imagination that CHP might go that way, but so far nothing has been said to suggest they are moving in that direction.

While P25 can absolutely be used on Low Band, how it would respond to a high noise floor and possible skip interference would need to be looked at.
 
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I think the information you saw about the site upgrades are/were for the CHP 700 MHz LMR radio system, although they also did a lot of low band site upgrades several years ago when the moved away from 42.xx for both the base and mobile frequencies. They do have a 700 MHz system in place at all of the CHP area offices and several other sites that allow the officers to talk with dispatch on 700 MHz P25.
No. The document was a budget document calling for the replacement or upgrade of 272 radio site's, 103 offices, and 25 Communications Centers. There are not 277 offices. There are only 103. We do not have a statewide 700 megahertz system for portables only. Each station has their own. The officer does not need a 102 foot tower at the station so he may be reached on his handheld while he's in the office. I've been in enough CHP stations to know that there is a remote control station behind the counter for the station to operate on numerous channels. Common sense tells us that they're not going to spend tens of millions of dollars so an officer may be reached on his portable radio while he's inside the station. The document title is:

California Highway Patrol Enhanced Radio System. (CHPERS) - Phase 1 Replace Towers and Vaults. Project Status and Type.

One such document read:

COBCP Abstract:
California Highway Patrol Enhanced Radio System (CHPERS): Replace Towers and Vaults Phase 1: $10,208,000 from the Motor Vehicle Account for the construction phase of this project at the Leviathan Peak and Sawtooth Ridge radio tower sites ($5,671,000 for Sawtooth Ridge and $4,537,000 for Leviathan Peak). The overall CHPERS Phase I project includes the construction of a fully operational communications tower and associated support infrastructure at seven sites. For the Leviathan Peak and Sawtooth Ridge sites, total costs are estimated at $13,034,100, including acquisition ($440,000), preliminary plans ($1,411,100), working drawings ($975,000), and construction ($10,208,000). The construction amount includes $7,905,000 for the construction contract, $395,000 for contingency, $1,009,000 for architectural and engineering services, and $899,000 for other project costs. Acquisition is expected to be completed in February 2020. Preliminary plans are estimated to be completed in May 2020. Working drawings are estimated to be completed in February 2021 and construction is estimated to begin in March 2021 and be completed by October 2022.

B. Purpose of the Project: The Sawtooth Ridge radio tower site will be the primary communications tower for the Needles, Barstow, Morongo Basin, and Victorville area offices. The construction of a 120-foot, self supporting tower and associated support infrastructure at the Sawtooth Ridge radio tower site is essential for providing adequate radio coverage in eastern Riverside County for the CHP and additional emergency services agencies and nonemergency entities that lease space from the CHP. The construction of an 85 foot, self-supporting communications tower and associated support infrastructure at the Leviathan Peak radio tower site will provide necessary radio coverage for the South Lake Tahoe Area office. In 2017, the United States Forest Service amended its forest management plan to require that power be provided by a solar array. As a result, the Department of General Services modified the design for the Leviathan Peak project to incorporate the solar array. Approval of construction funding for the Sawtooth and Leviathan Peak radio sites will ensure that the CHP is able to move forward with the CHPERS Phase I project to improve and maintain mission critical radio communications.


This is very frustrating. I'm new at scanning but that doesn't mean I don't know how to read a capital budget request. With a degree in Public Administration, I am more than familiar with creating capital budget proposals from inception to completion. If one Google's State of California Capital Budget Outlay California Highway Patrol you will come up with myriad budget requests as well as cancellations for a $2.6 billion dollar California Highway Patrol Enhanced Radio System Upgrade. I've just spent an hour trying to find the exact document to prove that what I read is actually what I read because I've just been told I didn't read what I've already read just so I don't look stupid. The problem is that the documents are all PDFs by the same name and they want to overwrite each other. I'm not going to continue digging around Google trying to find the exact one that specified the number of repeater sites and offices which were delineated separately. It was in this document that specified a P25 radio system and the Kenwood 5600HP was selected but "is not P25 capable but probably could be with a firmware upgrade." The APCO 25 standard is for all law enforcement agencies to be P25 compatible and I can tell you that the public release of personally identifiable information over the radio that is not encrypted is not allowed. It has to be sent by MDT only. I shouldn't have asked the original question to begin with.

Project 25 (P25 or APCO-25) is a suite of standards for digital mobile radio communications designed for use by public safety organizations in North America. P25 radios are a direct replacement for analog UHF (typically FM) radios, but add the ability to transfer data as well as voice, allowing for more natural implementations of encryption and text messaging. P25 radios are commonly implemented by dispatch organizations, such as police, fire, ambulance and emergency rescue service, using vehicle-mounted radios combined with handheld walkie-talkie use.

CHPERS Simplified

Infrastructure Enhancement – 447 locations:
• 272 remote radio vault sites
• 103 Area offices
• 25 communications centers
• 17 inspection facilities and 30 platform scales
• Tactical Channels - Independent Operation
• Vehicle Tactical Network – Consolidated Patrol
• Vehicle Environment (CPVE) and new VRS
• Acquisition of spectrum


Sensitive PII—such as passport, driver's license or Social Security numbers—however, requires encryption in transit as well as at rest to prevent harm being caused to the individual if their PII ends up in the wrong hands.
 

scannerboy02

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The document you posted was for the site upgrades they did when they moved from using 42 MHz frequencies on both the base and mobile side. They now use 39/44/45... on the base side and mostly 42 on the mobile side. They also installed the CPVE system in the cars around the same time that included low band/VHF/UHF/700/800 radios in all cars controlled by a consolidated computer system. This was also when they installed a large number of the 700 MHz P25 VRS systems, although they had already been doing this prior to the CPVE.

I have attached documentation for the CHP 700 MHz LMR radio system for you to look at. They have ~100 watt transmitters at each CHP area office as well as a few other locations.
 

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scannerboy02

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They are now in the process of replacing the CPVE system in the cars with a new system that moves away from the CPVE and this is being done with the Kenwood RF deck radios.

A few different radio projects were all done around the same time, +/- a year or so.
They did an upgrade to the low band radio sites.
They built out a 700 MHz P25 LMR system at the area offices.
They installed a CPVE system in the patrol cars.

They are now working on new projects.
Installing a new radio system in the patrol cars.
Building out a "statewide" 700 MHz P25 trunking system. This system will be used as a "secondary" (or interoperable) radio system for many different users.
 

wowologist

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No. The document was a budget document calling for the replacement or upgrade of 272 radio site's, 103 offices, and 25 Communications Centers. There are not 277 offices. There are only 103. We do not have a statewide 700 megahertz system for portables only. Each station has their own. The officer does not need a 102 foot tower at the station so he may be reached on his handheld while he's in the office. I've been in enough CHP stations to know that there is a remote control station behind the counter for the station to operate on numerous channels. Common sense tells us that they're not going to spend tens of millions of dollars so an officer may be reached on his portable radio while he's inside the station. The document title is:

California Highway Patrol Enhanced Radio System. (CHPERS) - Phase 1 Replace Towers and Vaults. Project Status and Type.

One such document read:

COBCP Abstract:
California Highway Patrol Enhanced Radio System (CHPERS): Replace Towers and Vaults Phase 1: $10,208,000 from the Motor Vehicle Account for the construction phase of this project at the Leviathan Peak and Sawtooth Ridge radio tower sites ($5,671,000 for Sawtooth Ridge and $4,537,000 for Leviathan Peak). The overall CHPERS Phase I project includes the construction of a fully operational communications tower and associated support infrastructure at seven sites. For the Leviathan Peak and Sawtooth Ridge sites, total costs are estimated at $13,034,100, including acquisition ($440,000), preliminary plans ($1,411,100), working drawings ($975,000), and construction ($10,208,000). The construction amount includes $7,905,000 for the construction contract, $395,000 for contingency, $1,009,000 for architectural and engineering services, and $899,000 for other project costs. Acquisition is expected to be completed in February 2020. Preliminary plans are estimated to be completed in May 2020. Working drawings are estimated to be completed in February 2021 and construction is estimated to begin in March 2021 and be completed by October 2022.
LOL your actually trying to chase $$ in the State of California .....good luck with that. (ref; the high speed trillion dollar train to no where funds that have been allocated, reallocated, spent, re-spent, reallocated etc etc etc...)

Both the DoT/CHP and CDF have funky intertwined radio systems ...that were and are literally purpose built and don't fit into check boxes. They are administered by people that have literally spent ther entire career maintaining and making sure it works for the specific agencies non-standard needs.

What's happening now is the ability for both agencies to provide comms in mutual aid situations while KEEPING ther own systems intact and operable for their specific state-wide needs.

And they seem to be doing it quite well when you take into consideration the mish-mash of outside radio systems and frequency bands involved.
 
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Messages
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Location
Murrieta, CA
The document you posted was for the site upgrades they did when they moved from using 42 MHz frequencies on both the base and mobile side. They now use 39/44/45... on the base side and mostly 42 on the mobile side. They also installed the CPVE system in the cars around the same time that included low band/VHF/UHF/700/800 radios in all cars controlled by a consolidated computer system. This was also when they installed a large number of the 700 MHz P25 VRS systems, although they had already been doing this prior to the CPVE.

I have attached documentation for the CHP 700 MHz LMR radio system for you to look at. They have ~100 watt transmitters at each CHP area office as well as a few other locations.
You're a 2014 document it's a bit outdated.

You may not have noticed but the output power was expressed in ERP. An ERP of 100 watts corresponds to an actual radiated power of 5-10 watts, depending on the type of antenna used. Ham classes plus an online calculator...

I live in the mountainous Temecula area that includes the Cleveland National Forest. 5-10 watts at 800mhz is not going to cover more than a couple of miles. I'm sure in more demanding areas like the 58 going from Mojave to Bakersfield their HT's would stand no chance of being heard on the station channel. Or in Forest Falls in the San Bernardino Mountains where I was hiking until the fires. The Arrowhead station is a very long ways away. I'm sure you didn't intend to, but you write as if the station frequency is a 700 MHz version of their low-band system. I get that from your statement that they're transmit power is ~100w. That would imply a wide area coverage. That it is not. According to the CHP radio instruction guide, the real purpose of this frequency is for VIP escorts through the area. It is intended more for car to car then station to car.

"Please note that the CHP is now dropping use of the CPVE equipment and returning to the older scheme of a mobile radio and a separate laptop computer. The new mobile radios will be a multi-band Kenwood design. The touch-screens and trunk full of equipment will be gone."

The only question remaining is the original one. Will they go to encryption?
 
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