Newbie - asking for historical help/knowledge - Criminal cold case investigation

KevinC

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Upon landing and gathering his chute Cooper transmits his whereabouts to his pickup
How would he know where he is? At least enough to be able to convey that to someone else?
 

trentbob

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Hi again

I must stress, those are hypotheses In general, not specifically mine!

Re '

I am trying to establish if Cooper could have landed somewhere in the wide open approaches to Reno airport, probably at least 10 miles out, the terrain there is very conducive to a parachute jump.

Upon landing and gathering his chute Cooper transmits his whereabouts to his pickup

the 'transmits' bit is why I have come here seeking help - it seems a 2 way radio was possibly too large (although it could have been concealed in his briefcase or upon his body when he boarded.

If not a 2-way radio, is there any beacon-like technology he could have used to signal his position?
Mmm.. sometimes it's good to step back and take a fresh look, in 1968 a pocket-sized device was developed and called a Avalanche Beacon..

It was actually sold in 1971 under the brand name of Skadi.. I would research that on Google, it seems to be a fixed frequency and I'm not sure exactly what kind of receiver would be used by the accomplice, if it's used to find Avalanche victims by search and rescue there must be a way to home in on the beacon. Don't know the range or exactly how it works but there is a good start for a detailed Google search.
 

KevinC

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Mmm.. sometimes it's good to step back and take a fresh look, in 1968 a pocket-sized device was developed and called a Avalanche Beacon..

It was actually sold in 1971 under the brand name of Skadi.. I would research that on Google, it seems to be a fixed frequency and I'm not sure exactly what kind of receiver would be used by the accomplice, if it's used to find Avalanche victims by search and rescue there must be a way to home in on the beacon. Don't know the range or exactly how it works but there is a good start for a detailed Google search.
I believe that device had a very limited range, like a couple hundred feet at most.
 

trentbob

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I believe that device had a very limited range, like a couple hundred feet at most.
Yep that would make sense, search and rescue would already have a general idea where victims may be.
 

trentbob

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Well here's this picture of the original unit, I Photoshopped it as sharp as possible so you can blow it up with your fingers and read details. AC plug in charge, earphone, certainly doesn't look like it would have a lot of range, it also appears to be a transceiver that can transmit and receive.
PSX_20240701_140537.jpg
 

krokus

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A bit late to the party, but an option I have not seen yet: transmitting equipment staged in a few caches, in likely areas of landing. That would eliminate a lot of the size/weight restrictions, for a jumpable radio.
 

Deezine

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A bit late to the party, but an option I have not seen yet: transmitting equipment staged in a few caches, in likely areas of landing. That would eliminate a lot of the size/weight restrictions, for a jumpable radio.
Thats not a bad idea

So Cooper could have planted/hidden several transmitters in spread-out locations in and around his planned LZ?
 

BinaryMode

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It takes planning to drop into a planned LZ... There's just too much involved for that to be the case. And you need to be prepared for the bush... I say nay on this theory.
 

trentbob

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It takes planning to drop into a planned LZ... There's just too much involved for that to be the case. And you need to be prepared for the bush... I say nay on this theory.
I also don't think that is a feasible plan either, there of course was mobile CB radios in cars, I had one in my car in 1971, I imagine it would be CB radio or some type of simplex radio with limited range, if there was more than one radio planted, with the Intensive search done by the FBI, something would have been found.
 

krokus

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Thats not a bad idea

So Cooper could have planted/hidden several transmitters in spread-out locations in and around his planned LZ?
I was thinking 3 to 5 possible cache locations. Based on "I should land within a 20 mile radius of here..." That way you wouldn't have to hike more than about 8 miles, to a cache. (Or payphone, that was previously scouted.)
 

trentbob

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One thing's for sure, there was pay phones everywhere in those days, again, radio wise I'm thinking CB radio, and in a wooded area using the maximum wattage allowed, we would be talking maybe a 5 Mi radius depending on trees and growth.

If I remember correctly, Cooper was wearing a suit and loafers, left his clip on tie behind, the night that he made the jump in the area that he was in was pouring rain in the lowlands and heavy snow in the Cascade Mountains so the range of a radio planted somewhere would probably be about the maximum of 4 to 5 MI?

I think the Payphone is a good idea for communication, I would think a person would be able to research through the telephone company and find the location of every Payphone in the area, he could have made a collect call so he didn't have to carry a pocket full of change.

I certainly think the FBI would have traced every pay phone in a wide swath that could have been used and there would be a record of a number called.
 

trentbob

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In cities and built-up areas, yes. Out in the boondocks, no.
Yep, there were access roads but that would depend on where he landed, just a gas station or side of the road phone would be all they had.

And yes, not that many.
 

Deezine

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The FBI didn't search any of the outer Reno area - they were in force at the airport only
 

trentbob

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The FBI didn't search any of the outer Reno area - they were in force at the airport only
Just to get the geography straight, LE searched the area that they felt that he jumped, would that be along the Columbia River? The outer Reno area is where you theorize he may have ended up?

How close is that to where the eight year old boy found a small amount of the money decayed years later along the banks of the river?
 
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