What does Dec/Hex mean?

Jeremy1873

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Hi, I'm sorry if this seems like a stupid question. I'm new to scanning. I understand Dec is Decimal. It just confuses me because it's not like a regular frequency like " 159.16500" Instead it's "727". I'm really asking this question because I want a scanner (Deciding to get the Uniden bearcat bc125AT) and I don't know if Decimals are workable for this scanner or any scanner. Does Decimals have a range like frequencies? Are there certain scanners that I should buy for decimals and some frequency stuff? To recap I would just like to know what a decimal is, would it work with the scanner I've been looking at (any suggestions?), and how to program it when I do get the scanner.
Thank you.
 

mdulrich

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DEC and HEX is used for programming talkgroups on trunked systems, not frequencies. HEX or hexadecimal is a different numbering system. Read up on trunked systems and how they are programmed into a trunking scanner. Incidently the BC125AT isn't a trunking scanner, so those types of systems that you see DEC and HEX can't be programmed in that scanner.

Mike
 

hill

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Dec/Hex relate to talkgroups and this scanner can't track a Trunked Radio System or digital, so this radio won't work for you.

Hex would be Hexadecimal

I do own this scanner mainly for mil air.
 

ofd8001

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Decimal is a "base 10" numbering system that we are all used to. Hexadecimal is a "base 16" numbering system that the "high tech" folks use. It has the characters 0-9 plus some alpha letters. There are conversion programs on line.

And remember this, there are 10 kinds of people who understand binary: those who do and those who don't.
 

Jeremy1873

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DEC and HEX is used for programming talkgroups on trunked systems, not frequencies. HEX or hexadecimal is a different numbering system. Read up on trunked systems and how they are programmed into a trunking scanner. Incidently the BC125AT isn't a trunking scanner, so those types of systems that you see DEC and HEX can't be programmed in that scanner.

Mike
Thank you.

Dec/Hex relate to talkgroups and this scanner can't track a Trunked Radio System or digital, so this radio won't work for you.

Hex would be Hexadecimal

I do own this scanner mainly for mil air.
Thank you for this information. Do you have any recommendations for a trunked radio system?
 

Nchpiboy

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Decimal is a "base 10" numbering system that we are all used to. Hexadecimal is a "base 16" numbering system that the "high tech" folks use. It has the characters 0-9 plus some alpha letters. There are conversion programs on line.

And remember this, there are 10 kinds of people who understand binary: those who do and those who don't.
Heh Heh- I see what you did there.
 

Enjoi19

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Thank you.


Thank you for this information. Do you have any recommendations for a trunked radio system?
Let us know what general area you live in and what you’d like to listen to, then we can recommend the appropriate scanner for your area.
 

Jeremy1873

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gmclam

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Decimal is a "base 10" numbering system that we are all used to. Hexadecimal is a "base 16" numbering system that the "high tech" folks use. It has the characters 0-9 plus some alpha letters.
In hexadecimal:
A = 10
B = 11
C = 12
D = 13
E = 14
F = 15
The number sixteen is usually shown as 0x10 -- the 0x in front of the value indicates it is hexadecimal. It differentiates 10 as being 10 (dec) and 10 being 16 (hex).

Jeremy1873 said:
It just confuses me because it's not like a regular frequency like " 159.16500" Instead it's "727".
When you see a frequency for the channel, it is what we now call a "conventional channel". When you see a value such as that you've quoted, it is likely a "talkgroup" within a trunked system. Generally speaking you'll have to program a control channel frequency to scan a trunked system, then monitor for talkgroups. The talkgroup is essentially a virtual channel value.

Does Decimals have a range like frequencies?
Yes. There is a limit to the number of bits in a trunked system that are allocated to defining a talkgroup.

Are there certain scanners that I should buy for decimals and some frequency stuff?
The real question is what are you trying to monitor? If they are on a trunked system, you'll need a scanner that can monitor that system. All trunked systems are not created equal, and you might need a specific radio to monitor a specific system. All radios can receive conventional channels, although be aware of P25 (digital) channels as those require a digital scanner.

I will also note that you'll see a MODE column next to a talkgroup in a trunked system listed on RR. If it is marked as DE or TE it is an encrypted talkgroup and cannot be monitored (other than by official radio obviously).

For conventional VHF such as Cal Fire, just about anything will work fine. As for digital trunked systems, I highly recommend the SDS-100 hand-held, but it does sell for about $699. Yeah, OUCH. There's stuff in the middle, but you get what you pay for.
 
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Jeremy1873

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In hexadecimal:
A = 10
B = 11
C = 12
D = 13
E = 14
F = 15
The number sixteen is usually shown as 0x10 -- the 0x in front of the value indicates it is hexadecimal. It differentiates 10 as being 10 (dec) and 10 being 16 (hex).

When you see a frequency for the channel, it is what we now call a "conventional channel". When you see a value such as that you've quoted, it is likely a "talkgroup" within a trunked system. Generally speaking you'll have to program a control channel frequency to scan a trunked system, then monitor for talkgroups. The talkgroup is essentially a virtual channel value.

Yes. There is a limit to the number of bits in a trunked system that are allocated to defining a talkgroup.

The real question is what are you trying to monitor? If they are on a trunked system, you'll need a scanner that can monitor that system. All trunked systems are not created equal, and you might need a specific radio to monitor a specific system. All radios can receive conventional channels, although be aware of P25 (digital) channels as those require a digital scanner.

I will also note that you'll see a MODE column next to a talkgroup in a trunked system listed on RR. If it is marked as DE or TE it is an encrypted talkgroup and cannot be monitored (other than by official radio obviously).

For conventional VHF such as Cal Fire, just about anything will work fine. As for digital trunked systems, I highly recommend the SDS-100 hand-held, but it does sell for about $699. Yeah, OUCH. There's stuff in the middle, but you get what you pay for.
Hmm interesting. Thank you for this. I mentioned above what I’m looking for. I’ll re quote it here


Hey I’m in San Diego county. So here are some of the radio decimals.

Main ones:
San Diego County - Imperial County Regional Communications System (RCS) Trunking System, Various, California - Scanner Frequencies

www.radioreference.com
www.radioreference.com
San Diego City 800MHz Trunking System, San Diego, California - Scanner Frequencies

www.radioreference.com
www.radioreference.com
San Diego County, California (CA) Scanner Frequencies and Radio Frequency Reference

www.radioreference.com
www.radioreference.com
Not as important but would love to have:
California - Department of Forestry & Fire Protection (CAL FIRE) Scanner Frequencies and Radio Frequency Reference

www.radioreference.com
www.radioreference.com”

Any suggestions would help and again thank you for the information about decimals/hex and scanners
 

n5ims

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Hex vs Dec is basically just two ways of saying the same thing as far as talkgroups go. Some radios use Dec (most scanners) while others use Hex (mostly radios) so simply pick the one that's needed for your situation and ignore the other. You can almost think of it like English/Spanish where you use whichever is easiest for you and ignore the other.
 

ecps92

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Most Scanners use HEX for the SysID and NAC, not Decimal
Hex vs Dec is basically just two ways of saying the same thing as far as talkgroups go. Some radios use Dec (most scanners) while others use Hex (mostly radios) so simply pick the one that's needed for your situation and ignore the other. You can almost think of it like English/Spanish where you use whichever is easiest for you and ignore the other.
 

Jeremy1873

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W
Hex vs Dec is basically just two ways of saying the same thing as far as talkgroups go. Some radios use Dec (most scanners) while others use Hex (mostly radios) so simply pick the one that's needed for your situation and ignore the other. You can almost think of it like English/Spanish where you use whichever is easiest for you and ignore the other.
What would you recommend?
 

wtp

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System Name:San Diego County - Imperial County Regional Communications System (RCS)
Location:Various, CA
County:2 counties
System Type:Motorola Type II SmartZone
System Voice:Analog and APCO-25 Common Air Interface
analog and then it steps up to APCO-25 (digital scanner needed)
San Diego-Imperial County RCS NextGen
Project 25 Phase II
so this steps it up to a digital phase 2 scanner.
and half the san diego sites are simulcast
so you will probably want a uniden SDS scanner (the SDS100is handheld)
the 100 can run about $650
a uniden 325P2 would be around $400 but it might have problems with the simulcast stuff.
i trust these guys
 

Jeremy1873

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Thank you. So I assume that radios covers all San Diego county departments? So the uniden bcd325p2 or the Whistler WS1040 wouldn’t be a good choice?
 

wtp

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Port Charlotte FL
many here have posted that the SDS series handle simulcast the best.
but, you might be in a good spot (close to one tower) and might not have any problems at all.
 

Jeremy1873

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many here have posted that the SDS series handle simulcast the best.
but, you might be in a good spot (close to one tower) and might not have any problems at all.
Thanks. I’m right near one but not the others. Do yl you mind if you can explain what a simulcast is?
 

Jeremy1873

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many here have posted that the SDS series handle simulcast the best.
but, you might be in a good spot (close to one tower) and might not have any problems at all.
Thanks. I’m right near one but not the others. if hot don’t mind can you explain what a simulcast is?
 

wtp

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simulcast is where all the towers from 2 to whatever transmit the same thing at the same time ON THE SAME FREQUENCIES.
another thing is multicast where they transmit the same thing at the same time on different frequencies.
so lets say they use 6 towers and have 10 frequencies at each.
one way the whole county uses 10 frequencies (simulcast)
the other way they use 60 frequencies (multicast)
so it helps with using less frequencies and that gives everyone more to use. (frequency conservation)
 

Jeremy1873

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Ah I see. So where I'm at they use a simulcast and the uniden SDS100 handles that the best? As in if one unit transmits to dispatch then another they will go by which ever is first? For example E14 says "E 14 to dispatch" then E15 at the same time/frequency says "E15 to dispatch" they would have E14 go first then cast E15? Sorry if it's confusing
 
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