Any advantage of having 2 antennas?

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blackmonte

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Just mounted a ST2 approximately 35' in the air. It helped considerably. Before I was getting 1 bar on distant signals now getting 3-4 bars. Any advantage of having two ST2's on same mast say one pointing north and the other south? Or is that overkill?
Another thought is adding a directional antenna to try and pickup 800mhz approximately 30-40 air miles. I would prefer to run both coaxes into a splitter with one out to my scanner. Would that cause any issues with 2 different band antennas?


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popnokick

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LOTS of issues with doing that. Read:
http://m.radioreference.com/forums/GetThread.php?t=113057&bat=
 

LIScanner101

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You know, I've read about this and read about this many times. I've gotten that it's basically a no-no to combine IN-band antennas into one scanner no matter what kind of signal summing device you use. However, what I don't really see (perhaps I just missed it) is whether its OK to combine SINGLE-band antennas into one scanner. Say a VHF low-band ground plane, a VHF high ground plane, a UHF ground plane and finally an 800MHz ground plane. Would THAT work?
 
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prcguy

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Combining separate high gain antennas for each band is probably the best performance you can get but you want to use a diplexer/triplexer, etc and not a signal combiner like a TV splitter. A Di/Tri/Quad/Pentaplexer is a combination of high pass, low pass and band pass filters that combine with minimal loss and usually less than .2dB. A splitter used backwards will incur over 3dB loss for two antennas and over 6dB loss for combining four different band antennas onto one feedline.

I have a bunch of two, three, four and five band combiners and currently use an Austin Pentaplexer to combine a separate broadband military VHF lo omni that covers 10m through 6m, VHF 2m through 160MHz 4-bay dipole array, a military 225-400MHz 4-bay array, an A/S 450-470MHz 8-bay array and a 10dB 800/900Mhz omni, all onto one coax. I think it would be hard to improve on that and its way better than any single antenna could ever hope for.
prcguy



You know, I've read about this and read about this many times. I've gotten that it's basically a no-no to combine IN-band antennas into one scanner no matter what kind of signal summing device you use. However, what I don't really see (perhaps I just missed it) is whether its OK to combine SINGLE-band antennas into one scanner. Say a VHF low-band ground plane, a VHF high ground plane, a UHF ground plane and finally an 800MHz ground plane. Would THAT work?
 
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