Uhf vs vhf

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jaspence

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VHF or UHF

Where you live can also influence what you use. If you are interested in DMR, UHF out numbers VHF by a wide margin. Check the RR database and other repeater web sites to see what is in your area. As suggested, start with a dual band radio for your first radio.
 

AI7PM

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I'm with N9MXQ, at the prices out there now, get a dual band. A quality dual band, not the $45 dollar disposable that's a ***** to program.

Which (VHF/UHF) is better? May as well ask, "Do you walk to work or carry your lunch?" What's in your area repeater wise? Are you living deep in downtown, suburbia, or out in the sticks. Are you joining a club or repeater group (I hope so, cause this stuff cost money to operate), and if so, what have they got on the air?

Technical aspects between the two are well covered in your study material and test.
 

lmrtek

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2 meters is pretty much the modern CB band so radios and antennas are cheap and plentiful and repeaters full of CBers and kerchunkers are everywhere

440 tends to have people that got tired of the CBers and kerchunkers
and wanted to have an intelligent conversation or exchange technical
knowledge

There are far fewer 440 repeaters and even fewer users
 

vagrant

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2 meters is pretty much the modern CB band so radios and antennas are cheap and plentiful and repeaters full of CBers and kerchunkers are everywhere
The modern CB band? Wow, where do you live...oh PA. That is unfortunate if that is going on in the area local to you. It is not going on like that everywhere else.

440 tends to have people that got tired of the CBers and kerchunkers
and wanted to have an intelligent conversation or exchange technical
knowledge
Again, that is not the norm elsewhere. Many systems link their respective 2m and 70cm repeaters. If you mean simplex, again that is not the norm elsewhere.

There are far fewer 440 repeaters and even fewer users
What facts are you basing this statement on? I recommend you research the number of 2m vs 70cm repeaters in your area and elsewhere.



To the OP, you really should get a dual band radio. Pick one of the top three brands Yaesu, Kenwood, or Icom and enjoy. There are inexpensive Chinese radios, but do not get mad if/when it burns out or fails. Still, a $30 radio might be all that you need and you might be quite happy. If you plan to talk often I recommend a mobile radio over a handheld.

I prefer dual band dual receive handheld and mobile radios. This allows me to monitor a particular frequency on one side, while simultaneously scanning both bands/memories on the other side.
 
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2 meters is pretty much the modern CB band so radios and antennas are cheap and plentiful and repeaters full of CBers and kerchunkers are everywhere

440 tends to have people that got tired of the CBers and kerchunkers
and wanted to have an intelligent conversation or exchange technical
knowledge

There are far fewer 440 repeaters and even fewer users


Completely regional. 70 cm is far more popular around where I live, especially for link systems. Also lends itself to experimentation more due to size constraints and that a lot of experimental repeaters get thrown up on mobile duplexers (which can't be done on 2m) which are low cost.


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nd5y

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The modern CB band? Wow, where do you live...oh PA. That is unfortunate if that is going on in the area local to you. It is not going on like that everywhere else.
It's like that a lot of places. Maybe you're just lucky. There is a saying I heard well over 20 years ago:
2 meters in Roman numerals is 11 meters.
 

KE0GXN

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I'll second the duel band/duel receive. Both my mobiles are such and I couldn't imagine any other way to go if you like monitoring a particular frequency (in my case my club repeater) and scanning all the others on the other side.

Can't say I have any "CB" repeaters in my area either 2m or otherwise....the only CB repeater I know of is in California. :lol:

We also have a good mix of 2m/70cm around here too.
 

jaspence

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6 meter

6 or ten meters is no way to start with amateur radio. They both depend on band conditions, and 6 meter radios are not readily available. I have had 6 meters and can count the number of contacts on one hand. My choice for a solid first dual band would be a Yaesu FT-60. You will find many good comments in the various posts on RR and eham.net.
 

jwt873

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My post was more to illustrate that VHF is quite a bit more than 144 Mhz. -- Trying to dispel the notion that ham radio is just a souped-up version of FRS/GMRS that lets one use a Baofeng handheld legally.

As a side note... The E season on Six has been pretty hot this summer. The band has been open just about every day. There have even been some pretty good openings to Europe and Japan.
 

BamaChad

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For me and my area its VHF. I prefer VHF for the extra range anyway. But like many have said. Its easier to find a cheap dual band radio than a single band VHF or UHF anyway.Check a repeater book or listing online and see whats more available to you. Its usually VHF repeaters in my exp.
 

SCPD

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As many have said, depends on your QTH and what freq's are used most..

I will say that almost anywhere you will find a 2m net...

that said, i'd buy a 2m mobile like the kenwood tm-281 w a mag mount antenna or j-pole and you are good to go..

of course, you could get a uv5r handheld and call it a day..

i own and use all of the above...

in fact, listening to the nightly 2m weather net on my 281.....

j pole n the attic, life is good...
 

WX9RLT

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Which is better for a beginner uhf or vhf?
I prefer VHF. More activity in my area. All our nets are VHF. None on UHF.

I heard many start in UHF, and I know areas around my area (30 miles or so away) thats all they use is UHF in their area.

So its really a toss up. But VHF for activity, UHF for privacy lol.

On serious note though check into your local ham groups. They will help you out alot with this question in your local area.

Good luck and welcome to the ham radio community :)
 

KC3ECJ

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The UV-B5 and UV-B6 are good affordable dual band starter radios that you can get for around 30 some dollars.
The UV-5X3 is also good, it is a tri bander, costs a bit more, but you get the 220 band too.
 

jim202

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Which is better for a beginner uhf or vhf?
This is a loaded question without you providing some more clues as to just what your looking for.

A few comments on the bands. First of all, the lower in frequency you use, the further the range will be for normal communications. In other words, the VHF band will allow a greater range than the same kind of setup on the UHF band. In using 6 meters, you can get even further communications range than at a VHF frequency.

With that said, there are a number of issues to consider in what your trying to do. At VHF, on the 2 meter band, generally there are more repeaters available than what you will find on the UHF ham band.

If your talking public safety and commercial radio operation, the use is about split evenly between the two bands.

Antennas at the UHF band are smaller in size than a VHF band antenna. But your coax cable losses are greater at the UHF band than they are at the VHF band. You can get more gain in a UHF antenna than you can in a VHF antenna of the same size.

You will probably have more external interference on the VHF band than you will at the UHF band. Things like cable TV leakage, radiation from devices like TV sets, computers, computer network devices like hubs, switches, routers and network interface cards (NIC) all generate some noise that can fall in the VHF band and on lower frequencies.

I know this doesn't directly answer your question, but you didn't give much for us to go on in your wording of your question.
 
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