AMR New Haven

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theshadowman

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I'd like to monitor AMR, specifically for the city of New Haven. The DB has the freq listed as lowband, but I am under the impression that is no longer used for dispatching 911 trucks in town. Are they on their VHF freq that the DB has specifically labeled as "Chair cars"?
 

firerick100

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If I'm not mistaken I believe amr still uses low band in new haven for their dispatching to medical call,if I were you id put In The freqs listed in new haven and you will be able to tell which ones are used for medicals and which ones for chair cars.
 

theshadowman

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If I'm not mistaken I believe amr still uses low band in new haven for their dispatching to medical call,if I were you id put In The freqs listed in new haven and you will be able to tell which ones are used for medicals and which ones for chair cars.
OK thanks for the info, I appreciate it. I was wondering if they simulcast the low band and the VHF. I just read elsewhere that some of the ambulances still use the low band. I'm too far from New Haven at the moment but once I get back to the area this evening I'll have a better idea of what's what.
 

ecps92

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As the wiki indicates, they were last heard Dec 2011

Low band is also known as VHF, so your looking for the High Band
which is also listed.

Chair Cars were confirmed Oct 2013 as still in use
No one has reported/heard 155.2350 for Connecticut

Thanks, I saw that too but the entries for Primary Ops and Supervisors are outdated. The mobiles in the AMR units are all VHF for the region, not lowband. I just can't find anything that lists what they are using now. I am thinking it's either 155.205 or 155.235 but not sure.
 

theshadowman

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As the wiki indicates, they were last heard Dec 2011

Low band is also known as VHF, so your looking for the High Band
which is also listed.

Chair Cars were confirmed Oct 2013 as still in use
No one has reported/heard 155.2350 for Connecticut
OK from what I can see in the replies and what I found elsewhere is that while they still use 47.500, they are possibly simulcasting on 155.205 which is or was the Chair Car frequency. I'll program and confirm.
 

N1SQB

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I'd like to monitor AMR, specifically for the city of New Haven. The DB has the freq listed as lowband, but I am under the impression that is no longer used for dispatching 911 trucks in town. Are they on their VHF freq that the DB has specifically labeled as "Chair cars"?
Ok let me see if I can help shed a little light on things here.
First, AMR New Haven is dispatched primarily on 47.50 with a PL of 97.4. Now, as I write this, I am hearing AMR dispatch on both the 47.50 vhf-low frequency AND the 155.205 vhf-hi frequency PL.67.4. I hear the units respond on the hi band channel but not the low band channel. This could be because the 155 freq is repeated and the other is not. Very weird, but that is how they are operating / simulcasting as of today.
Now, the "Charlie" name mentioned earlier, is AMR New Haven cars, designated call sign when signing on with CMED on 462.975 PL 167.9 (med-10)
A 2 in front of the Charlie designated name (IE.. 2 Charlie 15 ) is a BLS unit, where a 5 before the Charlie designator ( IE..5 Charlie 24 ) is an ALS crew.
Once they go on to CMED, they are already enroute after having been dispatched by their own company dispatch.
If you are interested in hearing the "trucks" as you mentioned in your OP, then I'm going to assume you are talking about New Haven FD. They respond to medical calls as well as fire related calls. Their dispatch frequency is on 859.5625 with a DPL of 311.

Hope this helps!

Manny
 
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theshadowman

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Ok let me see if I can help shed a little light on things here.
First, AMR New Haven is dispatched primarily on 47.50 with a PL of 97.4. Now, as I write this, I am hearing AMR dispatch on both the 47.50 vhf-low frequency AND the 155.205 vhf-hi frequency PL.67.4. I hear the units respond on the hi band channel but not the low band channel. This could be because the 155 freq is repeated and the other is not. Very weird, but that is how they are operating / simulcasting as of today.
Now, the "Charlie" name mentioned earlier, is AMR New Haven cars, designated call sign when signing on with CMED on 462.975 PL 167.9 (med-10)
A 2 in front of the Charlie designated name (IE.. 2 Charlie 15 ) is a BLS unit, where a 5 before the Charlie designator ( IE..5 Charlie 24 ) is an ALS crew.
Once they go on to CMED, they are already enroute after having been dispatched by their own company dispatch.
If you are interested in hearing the "trucks" as you mentioned in your OP, then I'm going to assume you are talking about New Haven FD. They respond to medical calls as well as fire related calls. Their dispatch frequency is on 859.5625 with a DPL of 311.

Hope this helps!

Manny
Excellent! This is exactly the confirmation I was looking for. Plus, this explains some of the confusion. I also very much appreciate the info on how they operate. I knew the hi-band radios were in the newer ambulances but just didn't know if they switched frequencies or used both.

A friend of mine works with AMR and he says they don't issue portables to the medics so a lot of people buy their own. I told him I'd monitor and give him the frequencies, plus I just wanted to listen anyway but can't hear the low-band freq with my antenna. I was hearing the hi-band just fine yesterday though. Any idea what the repeater input frequency would be? It doesn't do much for me but I can pass that along to him.

Thanks again!
 

ecps92

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The VHF's are all Simplex

I'm sure if AMR wanted to they would provide their own employees with the needed information to properly program a radio on the Company channels

Excellent! This is exactly the confirmation I was looking for. Plus, this explains some of the confusion. I also very much appreciate the info on how they operate. I knew the hi-band radios were in the newer ambulances but just didn't know if they switched frequencies or used both.

A friend of mine works with AMR and he says they don't issue portables to the medics so a lot of people buy their own. I told him I'd monitor and give him the frequencies, plus I just wanted to listen anyway but can't hear the low-band freq with my antenna. I was hearing the hi-band just fine yesterday though. Any idea what the repeater input frequency would be? It doesn't do much for me but I can pass that along to him.

Thanks again!
 

theshadowman

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The VHF's are all Simplex

I'm sure if AMR wanted to they would provide their own employees with the needed information to properly program a radio on the Company channels
So does that mean no input frequency? or no repeater? Sorry if it's an elementary question, I'm not well-versed in how it operates.

I guess AMR is fine with people having portables, they just aren't spending the money themselves. They have a person who employees can buy from and who will also program but my friend is attempting to save money by using a VHF radio he already has for another job and have it programmed for free there. Make sense? I feel like the more I explain the situation the more convoluted the whole thing sounds! :) In the meantime, my problem is solved as I can now received AMR on VHF-hi. Thanks!
 

MrAntiDigital

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Just a quick thought here regarding employees buying their own portable radios.

If the employees spend their own hard earned money on portable radios, then AMR has no need to supply their employees with radios. That way, AMR can save themselves big dollars and some corporate executive can put that extra money into his own pocket. All at the expense of the employees who are out there doing the work and may sometimes struggle to pay their own bills.
 

firerick100

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I don't know why AMR does not supply their employees with portables,at least have a minimum of one for each rig so at least one of the medics can take it with them into the scene and if something they did not expect happened such a person pulled a weapon or needed Assisitance they would not have to run out to the rig.I live in Wolcott and the city of Waterbury has AMR and Campion ambulance contracted to provide medical services,Campion issues all their employees with portable radios.i don't know about any other Ambulance company such as hunters,Asm,,etc
 

MrAntiDigital

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A friend of mine works with AMR and he says they don't issue portables to the medics so a lot of people buy their own.
I consider that to be Unsafe working conditions. Going into some of those places, everybody should be carrying portable radios.

Then I remembered, I have a brother-in-law who has worked as an EMT for AMR in Bridgeport for several years. Just a few miles down the road from New Haven. So I called him. OF COURSE they issue portable radios to their employees. At the beginning of a shift and he turns it in at the end of his shift. Unless New Haven AMR is completely different from AMR in Bridgeport, everybody gets a portable radio.

My brother-in-laws biggest complaint is - he wishes they issued a case with strap similar to what many fire departments use.

So if employees at New Haven AMR do NOT get issued portable radios, they need to find out why. If somebody wants to listen for their own use, that's a completely different story. But employees should definitely NOT have to buy their own portable radios for work. I would suspect that AMR is a lot smarter than that, to require employees to buy their own radios. One of their employees get injured and is not able to call for help, would certainly open up a huge liability case for AMR.

"shadowman", tell your friend about this. Either he is stretching the truth a little OR he really needs to get the AMR employees of New Haven together and find out why they do NOT get the use of portable radios while working like their Brothers and Sisters of the Bridgeport AMR Service.

I am of course for Employee Rights and Safety. And while I'm at it, portable radios or not, let me Thank those AMR EMTs and Medics for the work they do. They save lives and help us everyday of the year, while we sleep and while we are awake. GREAT JOB GUYS and THANK YOU..

My name; Willy "D"
 

firerick100

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I am correcting myself from post number 14 above ,I was in Waterbury tonight at Wendy's having dinner and a AMR crew came in to get dinner and they did have portable radios with a carry case with strap.
 

rjk_165

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I was at an event a while ago and AMR was on standby. I had to get something from them and I know one of their guys had a Kenwood portable with the strap. I saw a medic at a call in town and he had an HT1000 but I think it was PD issued.

Really can't speak for anywhere outside of NH area.

Seems like the employees buying their own portables would bring on a legal mess of liabilities if something were to happen.

As far as the whole VHF/low band issue goes...

I know for SURE that the cars in my area are equipped with the necessary radios to use the low band system, you can spot the antenna and even the radio if you look through. Someone was telling me in another thread (might have been N1SQB) that the reason AMR is so scattered across VHF, UHF, and low band is because when they bought out the old companies like NH Ambulance, they just used the existing equipment and never changed. Who knows what their system is like... Seems like a mess to me. Maybe the VHF is for portables too? No idea.

But as N1SQB explained, you can catch them on both the low band and MED 10 dispatch channel in the New Haven area, we can both attest to that.
 

KB1JHU

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People shouldn't be surprised by anything AMR does to save money. All they care about is their bottom line. Employees are just numbers to them.
 

theshadowman

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I appreciate everyone's reply regarding the frequencies (solved) and the portable radios.

I will just respond to the portable radio comments holistically rather than address each on separately. I have been told that the only portable issued in the NH branch is the C-Med portable. Having just been on an intercept with an AMR crew I offered up the question. That was his answer. Since C-Med is a different band, that is NOT the same as a dispatch portable which is what I have been referring to. When it comes to AMR's dispatch frequency whether VHF-hi or low, the radios are bought by the person. Consider that just because you see a radio in a radio strap on one's person (and the straps are NOT paid for by AMR) does not mean it's safe to assume that they were purchased by AMR, or even more basic, that it wasn't just a department issued C-Med portable. In fact, most of the radios you'll see vary in model and manufacturer. I know that some employees buy Kenwood and Moto, but most buy Vertex due to cost. Whatever the reason and/or liability of such practices aside, I don't think this is across the board for the company. Maybe it's just NH, I don't know...or maybe it even as to do with time on the department. The C-Med portable is likely deemed adequate for use in an emergency or requesting PD or FD assistance. I know that on my department, there are not portable radios in every riding position on every engine. We have three dispatch/fireground portables and one C-Med portable for five riding positions which frequently get filled. That is a whole other argument/issue regarding use and liability.
 
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